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Recent Posts

Spring Break

Spring Break

Alexis Clark Meter staff writer Spring break is officially over, but it appears as if everyone has had a great break! A few students stayed on TSU grounds to complete classes during extreme spring break while others went home to spend time with their families. […]

Why Do We Game?

Why Do We Game?

By Victoria Gourdin Playing video games is more or less a given in today’s society. According to VentureBeat News, over 1.2 billion people are playing videogames worldwide and of those people, 46 percent of gamers are women and 54 percent are men. While men dominate […]

Are Millenials More Passive Than Previous Generations?

Are Millenials More Passive Than Previous Generations?

When it comes to millennials, a new term has been coined – political dropouts. When considering this term, it forces one to ask his or herself a couple of questions. 1) “Is it true?” and 2) “If it is true, why?”
If we assume that it is true, we must ask ourselves what has led to this disconnect. One reason may be that millennials do not have an extraordinary amount of trust in the government. According to the 2016 Millennial Impact Report, “more than half of millennials trust the government only a little or not at all, compared to 44 percent of millennials who trust the government some or a lot.” Some believe that, as a result, millennials participate less in political activism and more in civic activism.
To simplify, this means that even if the phrase “political dropout” is accurate, millennials still care about our sovereign state. However, there is a difference in ideology. The average Millennial believes that our issues are better resolved by the individual than the government. This theory is further supported by a 2014 Pew Research study in which 50 percent of millennials identified as politically independent as opposed to Republican or Democrat.
Still, while there appear to be reasons that explain the so-called political indifference of Generation Y, does this indifference actually exist? The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE) says no.
In a report titled “A Study of College Student Political Engagement,” CIRCLE found that “millennials are more involved in both civic and political life than their predecessors.”
This is because in 1993, the Charles F. Kettering Foundation published a study that revealed that college students at that time considered politics irrelevant to their lives. In comparison, CIRCLE says that students now say that politics are relevant to the issues that concern them.
But at the end of the day it is not about who is the most politically aware but who is taking the most political action. In this regard, I would like to see my fellow millennials doing a bit more.
TSU Blood Drive Allows Students to Help Others

TSU Blood Drive Allows Students to Help Others

By Victoria Gourdin When asked the question “why donate blood,” people have many different responses. Some do it because they feel it is the right thing to do. Others may know someone who might need blood. Still, regardless of matter what the reason is, people […]

Taking Pride in Our Faculty

Taking Pride in Our Faculty

By Shayla Simmons Over one year ago, Sandra Long Weaver agreed to advise The Meter, the student-run newspaper on the TSU campus. Beginning her legacy at TSU with only two students, she helped re-establish the newspaper read and loved by the student body. However even […]

TSU Holds First Sadie Hawkins Dance

TSU Holds First Sadie Hawkins Dance

By Christina Young
Staff Writer
Love is in the air as Tennessee State University holds its very first Sadie Hawkins, hosted by The Women’s Center.  The Sadie Hawkins Dance is usually an informal dance sponsored by a high school, middle school or college, in which female students either invite male students, or come with friends. The woman behind the dance, Seanne Wilson, thought the dance would be a fun thing for students to do on Valentine ’s Day.  Wilsons also says that The Women’s Center here at TSU is excited about doing many different things this year.
She said one reason for holding the dance was that “We wanted to reach out to students and see what they would be excited about, and a lot of the young men and women say that its always the same old event and they wanted to do something different.” The dance had food, entertainment, music and dancing for the couples and friends to enjoy.
Sophomore Leona Dunn thought the dance was an amazing event and made this one of the best Valentine’s Days she has had. “The Women’s Center throws the best events. I am so happy I got to spend my Valentine’s day with friends and people that I care about rather than being alone, and that’s what it’s all about.”
It’s safe to say that this Valentine’s Day, students got more than just a card and some candy. They got memories that will last them a life time.
Annual Women of Legend and Merit Awards Mar. 21

Annual Women of Legend and Merit Awards Mar. 21

By Leona Dunn, News Editor The 10th annual Women of Legend and Merit Awards ceremony will be held March 21, at 7 pm in the Tennessee State University Gentry Complex. Actress Vivica A. Fox will be the evening’s special guest and entertainment provided by Angela […]

Taylor’s Success Gained by Time at Tennessee State

Taylor’s Success Gained by Time at Tennessee State

By Christina Young Staff Writer Neysa Taylor, former Meter Editor at Tennessee State University and the current  Director of Communications at the Tennessee Department of Corrections, came to visit and discussed her time as a student here at Tennessee State University and how her passion […]

North Nashville History Preserved on the Plaza

North Nashville History Preserved on the Plaza

By Lavenia Chappel
NASHVILLE, TN — Originally a footpath from the Cumberland River to the Hadley Plantation, Jefferson Street was once known as one of America’s best known districts of jazz, rhythm and blues. It served as the home to artists such as Little Richard, Jimi Hendrix, Ray Charles, Pats Domino and Memphis Slim.
 “This was the only place black folks could find logic and enjoy themselves without being Jim Crowed,” said Dr. Learotha Williams, Professor of African American History at Tennessee State University.
 What was known as the “Golden Era,” ended in the 1960s once the construction of Interstate 40 segregated the community, he said.  “The construction was used in a way to display a poor population; hundreds of businesses were wiped out and tons of families and homes were displaced,” Williams said.
In 2012, Williams assisted in an attempt to restore the origins of the community. His goal was to turn to something new but not forsake the past. “Kwame Lillard gave me a tour of Nashville and that’s when I came up with the idea to create a project that will get the community interacting with each other and also pass on relevant information continuously,” Williams said.
 A celebration on Sept. 28 of that year unveiled his creation, the “Jefferson Street Gateway to Heritage” project, a pedestrian plaza that commemorates the African American history of Nashville and Jefferson Street.
The plaza is divided into five pillars that symbolize education, athletics, music, civil rights and religion and contains around 80 photographs and narratives about people whom have contributed to the rich legacy of Jefferson Street.
According to Sharon Hurt, JUMP’s Executive Director and Metro Council Woman at Large, there were a series of meetings held during that time where names were presented. Those names presented most often were selected for display on the plaza.
 Among those depicted are Ronald Lawson, who was inducted into the Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association (TSSAA) Hall of Fame; Erica Gilmore who was elected to the Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County Council in 2007, re-elected in 2011 and elected to council at large in 2015; Marion Barry who attended Fisk University and was involved in the Civil Rights Movement serving as the first chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and eventually became mayor of Washington, D.C. and Edith Taylor Langster, former member of Nashville Metro Council representing the 21st District. The project was a collaboration between public and private sectors that featured the works of local artists James Threalkill and Michael McBride.
The design of the open-air plaza in the 2500 block of Jefferson Street was to reenergize Nashville’s historic Jefferson Street while making a place that represents community pride and history for current residents and visitors.
Williams said when he thinks of North Nashville, he thinks of how the community transformed from a place of un-accommodation to a place of recreation. “I’m poor at predicting the future but the project bloomed into something bigger than I expected,” said Williams.
The plaza was intended to be phase one of a multi-phase project but it requires more funding and those plans have not yet been met, according to Hurt. The goal has been met to turn a dark, ugly, desolate piece into a beautiful project and today many Nashville tours start at the plaza because it provides the history of the North Nashville community.
 Within five years the plaza has improved the quality of life, stimulated growth and abided by the missions and goals of the organizations that invested time and money into the project, Williams said.
He added that he hopes to hand the project off to students of Tennessee State and Fisk Universities so he can move on to something else while the plaza continues to develop.
Great Debate Takes Place Between Two Institutions

Great Debate Takes Place Between Two Institutions

By Ada Taylor, Editor in Chief Tennessee State University was founded in 1912 and Vanderbilt University was founded in 1873. For the past 105 years, these two institutions have educated students less than three miles from each other, and yet the schools’ forensics teams have […]