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Why Do We Game?

Why Do We Game?

By Victoria Gourdin Playing video games is more or less a given in today’s society. According to VentureBeat News, over 1.2 billion people are playing videogames worldwide and of those people, 46 percent of gamers are women and 54 percent are men. While men dominate […]

Are Millenials More Passive Than Previous Generations?

Are Millenials More Passive Than Previous Generations?

When it comes to millennials, a new term has been coined – political dropouts. When considering this term, it forces one to ask his or herself a couple of questions. 1) “Is it true?” and 2) “If it is true, why?” If we assume that […]

TSU Blood Drive Allows Students to Help Others

TSU Blood Drive Allows Students to Help Others

By Victoria Gourdin
When asked the question “why donate blood,” people have many different responses. Some do it because they feel it is the right thing to do. Others may know someone who might need blood. Still, regardless of matter what the reason is, people can donate blood knowing that they will be changing and helping a life. According to one of the Red Cross representatives, blood is one of the most priceless gifts you can give to anyone. The need for blood is constant and therefore so is the need for donations.
Set in Kean Hall, students showed up to offer not only their time and blood but also their insight as to why they would give blood in the first place. When asked why donate, Nhadya Cambridge said “it’s cool to me and I’m not afraid of needles or blood.” The process was fascinating to her and she was also able to help someone else in need. She also mentioned how fast and friendly the overall process was and at the end, the patients were offered free snacks to help with recovery. For Lyric Lowe, the process was the same for her after the 14-gauge needle. She found herself in the donating chair because of her brother who beat cancer but constantly needed blood because of a stem transplant. Despite the fact that she was more than spiteful of the rather large needle, her brother alone led her to Kean and into the donating chair. Finally, Charlie Green said “There’s not one specific reason [to donate].” He said while singing hallelujah. For Mr. Green, donating blood could be for anyone and it was simply a public good.
Donating blood may appear to be a simple and easy thing to do, but it can make a tremendous difference in someone else’s life. Blood drives are proven to alter the lives of many different people throughout the world and TSU students seem proud to participate.
Taking Pride in Our Faculty

Taking Pride in Our Faculty

By Shayla Simmons Over one year ago, Sandra Long Weaver agreed to advise The Meter, the student-run newspaper on the TSU campus. Beginning her legacy at TSU with only two students, she helped re-establish the newspaper read and loved by the student body. However even […]

TSU Holds First Sadie Hawkins Dance

TSU Holds First Sadie Hawkins Dance

By Christina Young Staff Writer Love is in the air as Tennessee State University holds its very first Sadie Hawkins, hosted by The Women’s Center.  The Sadie Hawkins Dance is usually an informal dance sponsored by a high school, middle school or college, in which […]

Annual Women of Legend and Merit Awards Mar. 21

Annual Women of Legend and Merit Awards Mar. 21

By Leona Dunn,
News Editor
The 10th annual Women of Legend and Merit Awards ceremony will be held March 21, at 7 pm in the Tennessee State University Gentry Complex. Actress Vivica A. Fox will be the evening’s special guest and entertainment provided by Angela Winbush. Both women have a plethora of awards and nominations in their fields of work. They will support the five women nominated by their community and friends who will be honored at this event.
The Women’s center hosts the ceremony each year uplifting women of color who have made amazing achievements in their fields. The idea is to show that the university supports and sees the efforts of young black women currently on campus. It also gives the students real-life examples of successful women, role models that look like them.
“Young ladies that come and give their time to volunteer with the Women’s Center host the event every year, because those girls are one of the main reasons we throw this event. We don’t only want to congratulate; we want to inspire the youth,” said Seanne Wilson director of the Women’s Center.
Five women will be acknowledged this year for their achievements: Dr. Stephanie Walker the first lady of Mount Zion Baptist church; Ms. Cheryl White Mason, an attorney; Mrs. Yvette Boyd from R.H. Boyd publishing; Ms. Vicki Yates, a WTVF television news anchor and Ms. Teresa Phillips, the Tennessee State University Athletic Director.
Tickets are $100 per person. Students can apply for sponsorships through the school’s foundation.
Taylor’s Success Gained by Time at Tennessee State

Taylor’s Success Gained by Time at Tennessee State

By Christina Young Staff Writer Neysa Taylor, former Meter Editor at Tennessee State University and the current  Director of Communications at the Tennessee Department of Corrections, came to visit and discussed her time as a student here at Tennessee State University and how her passion […]

North Nashville History Preserved on the Plaza

North Nashville History Preserved on the Plaza

By Lavenia Chappel NASHVILLE, TN — Originally a footpath from the Cumberland River to the Hadley Plantation, Jefferson Street was once known as one of America’s best known districts of jazz, rhythm and blues. It served as the home to artists such as Little Richard, […]

Great Debate Takes Place Between Two Institutions

Great Debate Takes Place Between Two Institutions

By Ada Taylor,
Editor in Chief
Tennessee State University was founded in 1912 and Vanderbilt University was founded in 1873. For the past 105 years, these two institutions have educated students less than three miles from each other, and yet the schools’ forensics teams have never formally debated one another.
However, that all changed on Feb. 25 when The Great Debate took place at Gordon Memorial United Methodist Church.
As the first debate between the two universities, the event easily drew the community’s attention. Participation of 101.1 The Beat’s Adrian “A.G” Granderson as MC, and WTVF News Anchor Vickie Yates as moderator made it a special event. Still, it was the spirit of competition and local rivalry that drew the crowd and motivated participants.
The debaters’ responsibility was to resolve whether or not social movements based on identity are necessary. Tennessee State University students Mel Williams and Barbra Dudley argued the affirmative, while Vanderbilt students Kaylee Kohmaier and Apurva Kunte argued the negative.
Mel Williams defined social movement as “organized political actions for a specific goal” and said how they are necessary for social change. To negate this, Vanderbilt’s Apurva Kunte focused their argument on issue-based movements versus those based on identity. Kunte argued that people who are not a part of the movement will get grouped in because of identity, such as when BlackLivesMatter was blamed for the shooter who killed police offers in Dallas last year.
In response to this, TSU’s Barba Dudley said that a controversial issue will always bring backlash, and you cannot let this criticism and ignorance affect the overall movement. She went on to say that the difference between a social issue and movement is that the movement is necessary to fix the issue. Dudley’s debating style was passionate and she brought the crowd to their feet, at which point The Vanderbilt Debate team requested five minutes of prep time before responding.
At this point, Vanderbilt’s Kaylee Kohmaier stood to reaffirm the negative position by pointing out that Tennessee State University’s team did not prove that movements based on identity are necessary, only that social movements are.
In TSU’s closing argument, Barba Dudley gave an ardent speech about how “the issue IS the identity” and therefore cannot be separated. Her passion once again brought the crowd to their feet, but in the end the judges were not convinced. In the 1st annual debate between Tennessee State University and Vanderbilt, Vanderbilt one by two points – 41.5 to 43.5.
Still, supporters of both teams were not disappointed. One crowd member summed up the way everyone was feeling by saying “we usually see the athleticism [of both universities], but today was about intellectualism, so thank you to the students.”
TSU Graduate Jackson is the New Mr. Clean

TSU Graduate Jackson is the New Mr. Clean

By Raven Ashlee Mosely-Hall Staff Writer Mr. Clean has cleaned himself up and become a new man! TSU graduate Mike Jackson has replaced the iconic cartoon of the tall, handsome man dressed in all white with a single gold hoop earring, after 59 years. Procter […]