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A Year in Trump’s America

A Year in Trump’s America

A year has passed since the inauguration of the 45th president of the United States, swearing Donald John Trump into the highest office in the land. Even before his official term began, his road to the White House was highly reported and scrutinized for numerous […]

The Government Shutdown of 2018

The Government Shutdown of 2018

The United States of America was founded on the basic principles of a strong government. Society today functions the way it does because the country has the ability to fall back on what most consider to be a generally reliable and democratic government. That being […]

Net Neutrality and You

Net Neutrality and You

A hot button issue as 2017 came to a close was the Federal Communications Commission’s decision to end Net Neutrality in a 3:2 vote on Dec. 14. The outrage leading up to the vote was obvious with people rallying together to voice their dissatisfaction with protests and petitions. Now the questions remains as to how this decision is going to affect the way we use the Internet and what we can expect in 2018.

Net neutrality, as explained by USA Today, is the principle that Internet service providers (ISPs) should give consumers access to all legal content and applications on an equal basis without favoring some sources or blocking others. It also prohibits ISPs from charging content providers for speedier delivery of their content on “fast lanes” and deliberately slowing the content from content providers that may compete with ISPs.

Under the protections of net neutrality, which have only been in effect since 2015, Internet users have open, equal access to what the web has to offer. For example, Verizon could not show favoritism to Yahoo and AOL, which it owns, by blocking users from accessing Google or forcing them to pay a fee to connect its customers. Now that the Internet has been deregulated, such tactics would be legal so long as Verizon makes their customers aware.

The fear for those that use the Internet personally (read: everyone) is that the deregulation of net neutrality will lead to a surge in prices to use websites that have become commonplace. Such distress is not unwarranted as many look to how countries without the protection of net neutrality function, such as Portugal.

The Portuguese Internet system found itself in the spotlight when Rep. Ro Khanna (D-Fremont) brought attention to it in a tweet that quickly went viral on Oct. 26. The Twitter post attached a picture of Portuguese Telecommunications Company, mobile Internet service options.

On top of a basic monthly rate, subscribers to MEO could purchase add-ons for additional services, each averaging out to about $6 for 10GB of data. For each additional service, users can access apps that fall under that particular category. With “messaging” users can access instant messaging apps, Apple’s FaceTime and Skype; “social” allows for the use of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, and so on; the “Video” category covers YouTube, Netflix, Hulu, and so forth; “music” permits the use of Spotify, Pandora, and things of the like; the last category is “email and cloud” (Gmail, Apple’s iCloud, etc.).

Seeing such a different (and costly) alternative has many wondering what can be done to overturn the FCC’s decision before anyone see any noticeable differences.

The battle for net neutrality has become a legal matter. In Congress, Sen. Ed Markey (D- Mass.) has already announced plans to challenge the FCC’s decision to deregulate Internet protections via the Congressional Review Act.

To effectively overturn the decision, the vote would require a majority in both the House and the Senate. If successful, net neutrality protections will be restored. But, that will be easier said than done since a Republican majority currently rules both the House and the Senate. New York’s Attorney General, Eric Schneiderman (Dem.), will also be filing a multistate lawsuit against the FCC.

Yet if a bill is passed supporting the end of Internet protections the damage can be long lasting. To undo legislation would be far more difficult and time consuming, requiring Congress to vote something into law.

With each of these acts to reinstate former Obama-era protections being extremely new, any major change is still to come. No major modifications to the Internet, as we know it shall be seen anytime soon but we must remain vigilant as the year continues.

The Power of the Black Vote

The Power of the Black Vote

“Three hundred years of humiliation, abuse and deprivation cannot be expected to find voice in a whisper,” Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote in his book Why We Can’t Wait. More than three hundred years later, the voice of the black community, once a whisper, […]

The Double Standard of Drugs: When Weed Sees Color

The Double Standard of Drugs: When Weed Sees Color

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve heard the news that marijuana is big business. Weed has become an industry all on its own, creating overnight millionaires whether it be growing or selling and everything in between. According to Forbes, North America spent a […]

TSU’s Oldest Cheerleader Passes Away

TSU’s Oldest Cheerleader Passes Away

Tennessee State Universities Nashville Alumni Association had a moment last Tuesday, January 22cnd,  after a member announced that Burnece Walker Brunson was placed on hospice.

The source said Brunson would be spending her last days in her home with people she loved. This came up after a brief discussion about how the association would pay respect to members that pass away arose.

Not even a week later, Nashville’s press is buzzing about the “jewel” TSU President Glenda Glover says they have lost, according to a Tennessee Tribune Article.

Author, Teacher, Life-guard, and of course most known as cheerleader, Brunson’s spirit will be missed. Just last year her spirit went national as she starred as the featured ABC ‘Person of the Week’. You can watch that right here.

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ABC Breaking News | Latest News Videos

 

In the video Brunson was 101-years-old. She passed away this week at the age of 102.

Taking it back to the streets

Taking it back to the streets

This story will be posted soon. Currently going through editorial process.

Lawfully, you will be judged by your peers

Lawfully, you will be judged by your peers

By Leona Dunn

Student Court is back in session. With three new justices and six returning, the swearing in of the student court for the 2017-2018 academic school year took place on Oct. 19.

The court’s job is to go over student conduct cases and uphold/review the student government constitution. The office of student affairs allocated the court a new space last year equipped with a judicial bench, microphones, and room for a few other faculty to sit in on the hearings located in room 007 of Kean Hall.

“This room is for student court cases and our disciplinary cases as room 007 is designed to uphold the scales of justice,” Dean Stevenson, the advisor over the court said.

Stevenson has now officially implemented the student court as the fourth branch of the student government administration (SGA). Not only will the court be written into the constitution that is currently being revised, but the court will also be a part of all other aspects of student government life.

“I’m excited to work with you all, glad that you will be working as the first official judicial branch of student government, it’s an exciting moment and an exciting time so I’m excited to see how this is all going to work, all I ask is that you don’t impeach me,” SGA President JerMilton Woods joked, “but like always there’s much love, and you are officially welcomed in.”

A lot of the cases the student court handles come directly from the campus police department. The department practices both discretion and law, one law stating that you have the right to be judged by your peers. The department uses student referral practices often and appreciates the work student court does to make sure students are treated fairly for their actions. TSU Police Chief took time out of his busy schedule to welcome the court as well as offer words of wisdom.

“Congratulations,” Robinson said. “When you get these cases and these acts that will come before you, take advantage of this opportunity and deal with these things in a very serious matter. We always talk about and focus on active listening and making the right decision based on the information presented in front of you but also take these opportunities as life-long lessons that you will be able to take with you. After hearing some of the things that are happening and do occur, I hope you take those opportunities to be models of what you want the students to be, and look like.”

Members of the student court take the following pledge:

“I pledge that I will support the constitution of the student government association and that I will fairly interpret and enforce the policies of the student code of conduct of Tennessee State University. During my term I will faithfully and impartially discharge the responsibilities of the office to the best of my abilities I will serve with both integrity and high ethical conduct”.

Same Room, New Name

Same Room, New Name

  The Communications department at Tennessee State University held a tribute ceremony for a fallen professor this afternoon. Journalism professor, Gethan Ward, died December 16th due to an illness during winter break, a few days after final grades were due. The department made up a […]