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Excuse Me Mr. West, Mr. West?

Excuse Me Mr. West, Mr. West?

If you’ve consumed even the minutest amount of pop culture in the last few years, at some point you’ve heard about rapper Kanye West’s transformation into a belligerent, uninformed public figure for what can only be described as confusion. In a recent tweet from Oct. […]

Veterans To Be Honored At TSU Graduation

Veterans To Be Honored At TSU Graduation

When graduating from Tennessee State University last year, Ms. June recognized one disservice to her fellow veterans: No one recognized their service and sacrifices during one of their biggest milestones. As an Operation Desert Shield Air Force Veteran who was graduating Magna Cum Laude, she […]

Something About the White Supremacy Memorial

Something About the White Supremacy Memorial

If you haven’t heard, the National Memorial for Peace and Justice has opened in Montgomery, Ala. The feature is the first ever memorial “dedicated to the legacy of enslaved black people, people terrorized by lynching, African Americans humiliated by racial segregation and Jim Crow, and people of color burdened with contemporary presumptions of guilt and police violence” according to the official website.

Visitors to the six-acre location can see 800 steel columns, each representing a county in the U.S. with the names of the people who were lynched there, soil samples from confirmed lynching sites, as well as other sculptures and art “to contextualize racial terror”. The Holocaust Memorial in Berlin and the Apartheid Museum in Johannesburg inspired the project.

While I think the memorial is great, I really have to ask: is America ready to have such a memorial? Or better yet, is America even willing to have such a memorial?

A memorial invokes the idea that a party holds some form of sadness, resentment, and apology. There is guilt and a physical memorial serves to remind the public that such atrocities should never be repeated, as is the case of the Holocaust and apartheid. Guilt on behalf of the offending party is a natural association.

One look at news headlines any given day reveals that racism is alive, persistent, and nasty. The “playing field” has not once been equal on any grounds. In 2018 we not only remember Emmitt Till but also Trayvon Martin, Sandra Bland all the names that make up a continuously growing list of unjustly murdered Black people.

When asked “why build a memorial to victims of racial terror” on their website then answer, “a history of racial injustice must be acknowledged, and mass atrocities and abuse must be recognized and remembered, before a society can recover from mass violence”.

America is not sorry for the unsightly blemish that has infected the country since it’s founding. Never once has there even been an official apology on the behalf of anyone. And I don’t understand how art will make non-Black Americans acknowledge these atrocities when the proof is in front of their eyes even now.

So again I ask, how can such a tribute to atrocities exist when the world is watching us die?

Local Poet Emphasizes Mental Health Awareness

Local Poet Emphasizes Mental Health Awareness

By Alexis Clark Meter Staff Writer When it comes to mental health why does the Black community suffer in silence? It is time to address the issues that are hidden below the surface and poetess Aneisha “Epifany” Wright plans on spreading more awareness on this […]

What March for Our Lives Means for the Future of Black Lives Matter

What March for Our Lives Means for the Future of Black Lives Matter

By Shayla Simmons

Editor-in-Chief

The young leaders of the March for Our Lives movement accomplished much in little time, leading a protest both online and in person that garnered international attention, celebrity endorsements and an outstanding wave of support.

It has been an impressive feat considering that most of the faces of the movement are not yet of legal age to vote. But most importantly, they had the foresight and humanity to allow for overlooked voices to use their platform.

In the wake of the March for our Lives demonstration, which took place March 24 on the nation’s capital and across the world, a very important question needs to be asked: Where does Black Lives Matter belong in the outcry for gun reform?

Despite their age, the young activists who are the face of the movement have the answer that many three times their age have yet to grasp _ Black Lives Matter has a place at the table in the discussion about gun control.

One of the most prolific and impactful speeches made at the march came from 11-year-old Naomi Wadler, whose entire message was “to acknowledge the African American girls whose stories do not make the front pages of every national newspaper, whose stories don’t lead on the evening news”. Unfortunately, her simple truth is still unnecessarily controversial.

The issue is not with the student leaders and those brave enough to stand with them. Rather, the issues concern those that cannot truly support the cause. The time, donations, and support offered to March for Our Lives are outstanding, but the same love and passion should be extended to the people of color who are consistently under the onslaught of gun violence.

There is an extreme lack of awareness, sympathy, and understanding of the Black experience. There are no magazine covers for our leaders. Multiple thousand-dollar checks are not being written in our name. And we are not seen as revolutionaries, but rather rioters. The playing field is not level in the public opinion of the media or even the private thoughts of individuals.

But all hope is not lost. We are witnesses to a change for the better.

“…We are here to join together in unity fighting for the same goals. I say family because of all the pain that I see in the crowd. And that pain is another reason why we are here. Our pain makes us family. Us hurting together brings us closer together to fight for something better,” said Alex King, a student at Chicago’s North Lawndale College Prep, another speaker at the march.

Something better is on the horizon only because the stage is being shared with the unrepresented, and with it, our voices are louder than ever before.

Latest Yearbook Will Not Mimic the Past

Latest Yearbook Will Not Mimic the Past

By Leona Dunn The yearbook will be unveiled with a fresh face in the fall, as student volunteers strive to make it better than last years. The office of Student Activities was given the duty of making the yearbook after one graduating senior, Rochelle Brown, […]

Women’s Center Director becomes an Author

Women’s Center Director becomes an Author

By Leona Dunn The Women’s Center director is now a published author, and her first order of books is already sold out. Miss Seanne Wilson, was named the director of the Tennessee State University Women’s Center last year after years of handling the day to […]

Who is Un-Opposed?

Who is Un-Opposed?

For the first time in three years all top four positions have competition, but still class delegations lack the numbers needed to fill their delegation for next academic school year. Even though the top four competition is exciting, the lack of secretaries and treasurers, vice presidents and even presidents for some of the classes is why associations fail.

“We need all hands on deck,when all of the responsibility falls on one person because no one is willing to run- no one is willing to help out- its sad really,” current president JerMilton Woods said.

When asked a lot of students respond that Student Election Commission week is just another popularity contest. One student says she will not vote because all the students do is feed you for a week, and after the week the fire is lost.

“All the candidates do is feed us , they feed us food and they feed us lies- after my sophomore year I just didn’t have faith anymore that anything was going to change, so now Im just trying to eat their food and graduate,” says  a source that doesn’t want her name revealed.

Others feel better about this upcoming election. Student Election Commission has reported that this is not only the first time (since current seniors have been here) that all top four positions have had competition, it is also the first time they have had more than two candidates go for the same title in multiple positions within the last five years. A student that has been here since 2014 and is still here due to switching majors is excited about this week.

“I feel like its important to have people lead the school because the one thing the school really needs is leadership and this is the first year since 2014 that I have had someone actually come up to me and say vote for me, opposed to their campaign teams doing it and the announcements on the intercom doing it, ” junior Hashim Sirleaf said, ” I am actually going to vote this year for one person, so far, but only one person.”

Maybe Sirleaf’s response is the reason some candidates do not run. People are scared that they will not get the votes. Out of over 30 positions there are 4o candidates running for only 21 positions, leaving half of the administration vacant to be filled through executive appointments.