Serving Tennessee State University and the Nashville Community Since 1950

Author: Shayla Simmons

Graduate School Hosts First Recruitment Fair

Graduate School Hosts First Recruitment Fair

By Lucas Johnson NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service)  Tennessee State University’s School of Graduate Studies and Research is hosting a recruitment fair on Jan. 28 to showcase its excellent programs, and more. The fair, the school’s first, will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 […]

Several Graduate from New Management Training Program

Several Graduate from New Management Training Program

By Emmanuel Freeman NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service) — Tennessee State University is making sure all its employees holding management positions are proficient in their areas. On Jan. 12, TSU President Glenda Glover presented certificates to 18 managers who completed the first in a series […]

TSU’s Office of International Affairs Partners With Local Middle School for International Day

TSU’s Office of International Affairs Partners With Local Middle School for International Day

By Lucas Johnson
Tennessee State University’s Office of International Affairs will join students and faculty at Margaret Allen Middle Prep on Friday, Jan. 27, as sponsors of the school’s annual International Day.
The celebration emphasizes the advantages of learning about diverse cultures, study abroad opportunities and the exchange of experiences. This is the first year TSU is partnering with Margaret Allen.
“Throughout the year, we work with middle and high schools to establish a pipeline to post-secondary education,” said Dr. Jewell F. Winn, senior International Affairs officer and deputy chief diversity officer at Tennessee State. “This year we are looking at going to different international days and will set-up displays and show off the different cultures represented at TSU.”
Several of TSU’s international student clubs will lead discussions with approximately 250 7th and 8th graders on food, the arts, clothing, music and other cultural aspects from their diverse countries. Workshops will be facilitated by TSU students with Saudi Arabian, African and Kurdish heritage.
“We are excited to have an African drummer who will join us and do an interactive drum session with the student and teach them about African beats,” Winn said. “In addition, our students who have participated in study abroad opportunities will make poster presentations and share those experiences.”
Andy Mizell, a member of Margaret Allen’s International Day Committee, said the school has hosted an International Day celebration for more than a decade. With a diverse group of about 500 students, 21 different languages are spoken within the school walls.
“It [International Day] has always been amazing to see the diverse population of students come together and give special performances, as well as share in some of the cuisines from their cultures,” Mizell said. “This year will be the best, having TSU as a partner and adding college level performances and workshops for our students, will greatly heighten the International Day experience for them. They are surely never going to forget this one!”

A Junior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Shayla self identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

TSU Goes After Legislative Support

TSU Goes After Legislative Support

By Lavenia Chappel From the ground breaking cancer research to the new developments within the engineering department, members of the Tennessee State University family on Feb. 1 presented information about its innovative programs at the 4th annual “TSU Day at the Capitol.”  The event was held […]

The Grassroots Are Moving

The Grassroots Are Moving

By Khandi Wilson Marc Sternberg, a native born in Baton Rouge said in an interview with NPR, “Before Dr. King had a dream, before Rosa kept her seat, and before Montgomery took a stand, Baton Rouge played its part”. In 1950, Baton Rouge had African-American […]

More Than 300 Students, Volunteers Participate in MLK, Jr. Day of Service

More Than 300 Students, Volunteers Participate in MLK, Jr. Day of Service

By Emmanuel Freeman
NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service) — Tennessee State University is continuing the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with an MLK Day of Service.
On Saturday, Jan. 21, more than 300 TSU students and volunteers participated in various projects around Nashville that included working with kids, assisting elderly residents, packing food, painting and hanging photos.
The MLK Day of Service at TSU is organized each year by the Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement to give students, faculty and staff an opportunity to celebrate King’s legacy through service.
The center was one of six organizations to receive federal and matching funds two years ago from the Corporation for National and Community Service to mobilize volunteers to honor King’s memory through service projects.
“Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. believed in service, and this initiative falls in line with not just his belief, but TSU’s motto – Think. Work. Serve,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “We’re proud that TSU was selected as one of six institutions to help lead this national service project.”
Like the other institutions, TSU mobilizes students and community volunteers to take on projects around the city.
Barbara Dudley, a senior economics and finance major, was one of about 25 students who cleaned windows, sanitized chairs and shelves, moved trash and cleaned the yard and the parking lot at Grace M. Eaton Child Care and Early Learning Center on Saturday.
“It feels really good to give back,” Dudley said. “I have always had a passion for service and for children and to be able to help at a day care just makes it more meaningful for me.”
Mahalia Howard, the executive director of the center, agrees.
“I think it is wonderful for young people to give back to the community,” she said. “What they are doing for us here today is a blessing because we are a non-profit. We don’t have the funds to pay for the things they are doing. What they are doing is helping to support at-risk students.”
In La Vergne, Tennessee, more than 30 volunteers performed various chores for elderly residents at AHEPA 343, an independent living apartment complex for seniors. They cleaned living areas, moved trash, hung pictures, and moved furniture.
Linda Tynan, 68, a six-year resident, who just needed company, was moved to tears by the students’ willingness to help.
“I think its terrific to see these students take up their time to come and lend a hand to people they don’t even know,” Tynan said. “What they are doing today might not seem much to them, but I appreciate every minute of it.”
Dr. Linda Guthrie is the director of the Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement. She said the MLK Day of Service is one of the most exciting events the center has ever undertaken.
“It is an honor to lead 11 other HBCUs throughout the southeast region of the country in serving our communities,” she said. “We should feel challenged and act on the challenge to do something good every day to make a difference in the lives of others.”
“We want people to realize that Dr. King’s holiday is not just a day off,” said Shirley Nix-Davis, director of a youth empowerment program at TSU and one of the MLK Day of Service project directors. “But it’s an opportunity to serve, and continue serving throughout the year.”

A Junior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Shayla self identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

TSU Helps Celebrate the Life, Legacy of MLK

TSU Helps Celebrate the Life, Legacy of MLK

By Lucas Johnson NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service) — Tennessee State University partnered with the Interdenominational Ministers’ Fellowship and the Nashville community to help celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Hundreds of people assembled in front of Jefferson Street Missionary […]

Ford Appointed VP  of Student Affairs

Ford Appointed VP of Student Affairs

By Shayla Simmons A new Vice President has been appointed to serve the office of Student Affairs here at Tennessee State University. Beating out 72 applicants, Dr. Tracey Ford said she is “very, very student-centered” and will work hard for their success. Ford was hired […]

50 for 50

50 for 50

By Victoria Gourdin
There is a distinct difference between a grade that is passing and grades that leave a student in good academic standing. Furthermore, anyone who is either active throughout the camps, invested in their grades, or both can easily understand how difficult getting to that good academic standing goal can be. Every day students are expected to balance their personal and social lives all while trying to keep up with the main reason for coming to a university: academics. With that being said, Tennessee State University’s SGA noticed a problem. At midterms this past semester, over 4,000 D’s, F’s and W’s were given to students throughout campus. For many, that number may not be relevant. However, the problem lies with the fact that the school is home to just over 9,000 students. In other words, about 40 percent of students were well below the “good academic standing” line. With these statistics, certain leaders within the SGA decided to take a stand and make a difference. They sat together and wondered how they could potentially decrease those numbers and statistics. Eventually they came up with a solution. The Student Government Association came up with the idea of 50 for 50. As a sort of incentive for people doing above average, fifty random TSU students will be receiving fifty dollars for making the Dean’s List. When asked about the 50 for 50, student Timia Porter mentioned that “it is a good way to get people to consider their grades more carefully.” She also said that she felt it was an overall good idea. The 50 for 50 is a way to encourage students to be better than average. Not only does it offer a slight incentive for a group of hard-working students but it also reinforces the importance of the intellect and what it really means to be in school. The 50 lucky students will find out who they are at the upcoming basketball game during halftime.

A Junior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Shayla self identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

Pullen Named Mr. Ivy

Pullen Named Mr. Ivy

By Christina Young In honor of Black History Month, Tennessee State University honors one of our very own black kings. This year we recognize Dwight Pullen as Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Incorporated’s new Mr. Ivy. Pullen’s goals for the upcoming semester include seminars on man-hood, […]