Serving Tennessee State University and the Nashville Community Since 1950

Author: Shayla Simmons

‘Why We Laugh’ Shown During Black History Month

‘Why We Laugh’ Shown During Black History Month

By Knija Kendrick Staff Writer The showing of “Why We Laugh” that was released back in 2009, directed by Robert Townsend and Quincy Newell, was shown on Friday, February 17th in the Student Success Center, where students can learn about the history behind black entertainment […]

President Trump’s Travel Ban and How it Affects TSU

President Trump’s Travel Ban and How it Affects TSU

By Shayla Simmons Copy Editor There are so many current events plaguing news stations that sometimes it may seem hard to keep track. However one to be aware of, of all of the latest executive orders passed by President Trump, is the nationwide travel ban. […]

Women of Empowerment Host Blanket Drive

Women of Empowerment Host Blanket Drive

By Leona Dunn
Women of Empowerment, the Tennessee State University chapter of the National association of colored women’s club, held a blanket drive to bring in the new year giving back.
“It was a thought that our president, Imari Scott-Cheatham, our paraphernalia chair Kelli Harris, and Residence Director, Mr. Cribbs all had together, which we decided to put into action,” says WOE member Kiara Davis.
It is not annual, but they might decide to make it annual depending on how successful this year’s drive is.
“The blankets and other warm items will go to both men’s and women’s shelters right here in Nashville. It hasn’t been challenging, besides the weather being wishy washy, but we may extend the drive’s deadline so that we can get more donations,” Davis said.
WOE will also continue servicing their campus and community with their annual Black Business Expo coming up in late February. The Black Business Expo is a showcase of local African-American entrepreneurs and business from the greater Nashville area. This is open to Fashion Designers, Hair Stylist, Photographers, Artist, Authors, Chefs, Bloggers, Nail Technicians and more. It is something to look forward to.
Nonprofit Group Supports Women on the Rise

Nonprofit Group Supports Women on the Rise

By Lavenia Chappel Shannon Lee in 2015 founded the Nashville nonprofit Ladies Who Strive “to motivate, inspire and educate” young women to accomplish their entrepreneurial and career goals. The organization is designed to be a support system for striving young women, something Lee felt was […]

Graduate School Hosts First Recruitment Fair

Graduate School Hosts First Recruitment Fair

By Lucas Johnson NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service)  Tennessee State University’s School of Graduate Studies and Research is hosting a recruitment fair on Jan. 28 to showcase its excellent programs, and more. The fair, the school’s first, will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 […]

Several Graduate from New Management Training Program

Several Graduate from New Management Training Program

By Emmanuel Freeman
NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service) — Tennessee State University is making sure all its employees holding management positions are proficient in their areas.
On Jan. 12, TSU President Glenda Glover presented certificates to 18 managers who completed the first in a series of management training programs aimed to bring participants up to speed on university processes and procedures.
The 10-week, 30-hour management-training program is for recently hired middle and senior management staff and others who have been in their positions for less than two years.
Glover said the program is part of the university’s effort to ensure excellence in all areas of operation.
“This effort is geared toward ensuring that we have continued improvement in staff performance, which is so important on our campus,” Glover said. “I am proud of all of the participants and I look forward to the level of productivity that comes with this training opportunity.”
Linda Spears, associate vice president of Business and Finance and director of Human Resources, said a focus group of representatives from all divisions came up with the curriculum and topics for the training program after meeting for three months.
“This is something we felt we needed and so Human Resources responded,” Spears said.
She said the intent is to acclimate new managers and administrators to TSU because many of them are not aware of certain operational procedures and processes.
“I would say that participants’ skill levels have certainly increased with this training,” Spears said.
Adrienne Frame, director of budget, has been at TSU for four years but became a director a year ago. She said the training opened her eyes to many things she didn’t know before.
“I learned a lot that I didn’t know going in as a supervisor,” Frame said. “I feel much more prepared as a new supervisor.”
Spears said the management-training program will be offered twice a year, in the fall and spring.
Among those receiving certificates were Dr. Lucian Yates, dean of Graduate Studies and Research, who started at the university in July; and Dr. Coreen Jackson, who assumed the role of interim dean of the Honors College about a year ago.
Others were: Phyllis Danner, director of Research and Sponsored Programs; Natasha Dowell, employment manager; Peggy Earnest, chief of staff in the Division of Student Affairs; Dr. Cheryl Green, assistant vice president of Student Affairs; Albert Hill, director of Business Operations, Facilities Management; Dr. William Hytche, executive director of Residence Life; Angela Jackson, associate registrar; and Valencia Jordan, associate director and senior women’s administrator.
Also receiving certificates were: Arlene Nicholas-Phillips, executive assistant to the president and liaison to the TSU Board of Trustees; Ben Northington, assistant director of fiscal accounts; Julius Proctor, area coordinator of Residence Life; Sonja Revell, Student Affairs coordinator for programming and mediation; Sheila Riley, director of Enrolment Services; Bradley White, associate vice president for Financial Services; and Valerie Williams, associate director for Learning Services.
TSU’s Office of International Affairs Partners With Local Middle School for International Day

TSU’s Office of International Affairs Partners With Local Middle School for International Day

By Lucas Johnson Tennessee State University’s Office of International Affairs will join students and faculty at Margaret Allen Middle Prep on Friday, Jan. 27, as sponsors of the school’s annual International Day. The celebration emphasizes the advantages of learning about diverse cultures, study abroad opportunities […]

TSU Goes After Legislative Support

TSU Goes After Legislative Support

By Lavenia Chappel From the ground breaking cancer research to the new developments within the engineering department, members of the Tennessee State University family on Feb. 1 presented information about its innovative programs at the 4th annual “TSU Day at the Capitol.”  The event was held […]

The Grassroots Are Moving

The Grassroots Are Moving

By Khandi Wilson

Marc Sternberg, a native born in Baton Rouge said in an interview with NPR, “Before Dr. King had a dream, before Rosa kept her seat, and before Montgomery took a stand, Baton Rouge played its part”.
In 1950, Baton Rouge had African-American owned buses that transported their black passengers to and from work. The system of these black businesses was struggling and asked for a wage increase. As a result, the pay increased all of five cents. The same day the fare increased, Reverend T. J. Jemison was present at city council when they passed Ordinance 222, which ran based on “first come, first served”.
These buses also catered to white passengers who were legally allowed to sit in the front of the bus while blacks sat in the back. The bus drivers did not comply with the new law and thus stopped coming to their jobs. The community then followed suit by communicating with local African-American residents telling them to not ride the city bus. The company lost a lot of money since the amount of passengers who used this system were 80% black. This movement gained national attention and a few years later Martin Luther King, Jr. implemented this system in Montgomery during the Civil Rights Movement.
Disagreeing with an idea is normal and quite common. As of late, Americans have been using their voice to fight for a system that represents them and their values. Just like in Baton Rouge, a grassroots’ movement has taken flight across the country. A group of former congressional staffers have written up the Indivisible guide for the everyday American to use when addressing their local congress representatives. It has not even been two weeks since President Trump moved into the White House, but already his administration is causing an uproar among Americans across the country. Far and wide, people are coming out in mass numbers to protest their opposition to the new administration and the new policies they are implementing using executive orders. This detailed guide teaches people who have no lobbying or governmental experience how to make sure their voices are heard while also being politically active in their community.
Instead of being upset when people see the news or the information being leaked through their newsfeeds, there is something that can be done to fix it, and more than likely someone in your community has already begun planning.

More Than 300 Students, Volunteers Participate in MLK, Jr. Day of Service

More Than 300 Students, Volunteers Participate in MLK, Jr. Day of Service

By Emmanuel Freeman NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service) — Tennessee State University is continuing the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with an MLK Day of Service. On Saturday, Jan. 21, more than 300 TSU students and volunteers participated in various projects around Nashville […]