Serving Tennessee State University and the Nashville Community Since 1950

Author: Shayla Simmons

TSU Honors Dr. Page

TSU Honors Dr. Page

By Christina Young Tennessee State University celebrates legacies by honoring the Pioneers of the Mass Communications department on March 3rd. The Distinguished honoree was Dr. Donald C. page, who has taught in the department of Communications since 1977, specializing in mass communications. Professor and Journalist […]

NABJ Student Chapter Makes a Comeback

NABJ Student Chapter Makes a Comeback

By: Shayla Simmons If one finds himself or herself interested in aspects of print, digital, or broadcast journalism, or wants to hone his or her skills, meet like minded peers and establish fruitful connections, the NABJ (National Association of Black Journalist) Student Chapter is worth […]

A New Conversation: A Student Opinion Piece

A New Conversation: A Student Opinion Piece

By Leona Dunn

The purpose of special elections in the fall has always been to bring in the Freshmen Delegation and fill any vacant spots in the current Student Government Association administration. Yet, lately it’s been looked at as an easier, expedited way to run for a position without putting in as much effort. In recent years, this has made special elections a goal for others, rather than the secondary option it was intended to be. Because of this mindset there has not been a full Student Government Administration going into the summer in the last three years. As a result, the current administration is looking for solutions to solve this problem.

Having a full Student Government going into the summer is essential, since that is when most training and orientations for the purpose of preparing students for their position happens, so that they may hit the ground running in the fall. Special elections were always meant for the freshmen class, and hopefully SGA can work something out that will help us go back into the summer with a full Student Government Association. That way, we will be fully prepared for the upcoming year once again.

A Junior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Shayla self identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

TSU OVC Championship

TSU OVC Championship

By Joshua Walden TSU’s first game of the OVC Tournament came against the fifth seeded Southeast Missouri Redhawks. They came into the game with (14-17) overall and (9-7) in the conference. TSU came into this game as the underdogs. They were the eighth seed with […]

Spring Break

Spring Break

Alexis Clark Meter staff writer Spring break is officially over, but it appears as if everyone has had a great break! A few students stayed on TSU grounds to complete classes during extreme spring break while others went home to spend time with their families. […]

Why Do We Game?

Why Do We Game?

By Victoria Gourdin

Playing video games is more or less a given in today’s society. According to VentureBeat News, over 1.2 billion people are playing videogames worldwide and of those people, 46 percent of gamers are women and 54 percent are men. While men dominate the world of gaming, women are not too far behind. However, that statistic does bring up the question of what type of games are out there. When asked what their preferred games were, people automatically assumed that the game would be for a specific console despite the fact that it was never specified. After a small poll from some TSU students, data showed that more people use the Xbox and PlayStation platforms. However, the “other” box was checked often as well. For many, regardless of gender, gaming goes far beyond a $300 console and some controllers. There are portable games, computer games, and even some cellular games that people prefer.

With that being said, people enjoy videogames in general and play them for different reasons. For some, they offer clarity and for others they simply serve as entertainment. For one TSU student, videogames serve as a distraction of sorts. When asked why he plays, Jory Teague mentioned that it was fun and it “lets [his] brain focus on something other than school. School can be difficult and overall stressful but having a go-to outlet such as videogames helps blow off some extra steam.” The debate about whether games are good or bad has been a commonly discussed topic, and while people are quick to put the blame on videogames for different types of mental and physical ailments, there has not been any “real” science to prove these theories. However, more professional studies are being conducted daily to find out the truth.

People want to know if videogames can actually be good for your health or if they make learning harder, inspire violence, or even affect physical health. With that being said, too much of anything is never healthy. Still, while there is the same lack of “real” evidence, many researchers are proving daily why playing videogames can be a good thing. Contrary to popular belief, playing videogames can make you a better decision maker, make you less anti-social, improve hand eye-coordination and even enhance your ability to learn according to an article from Game Designing.

 

A Junior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Shayla self identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

Are Millenials More Passive Than Previous Generations?

Are Millenials More Passive Than Previous Generations?

When it comes to millennials, a new term has been coined – political dropouts. When considering this term, it forces one to ask his or herself a couple of questions. 1) “Is it true?” and 2) “If it is true, why?” If we assume that […]

TSU Blood Drive Allows Students to Help Others

TSU Blood Drive Allows Students to Help Others

By Victoria Gourdin When asked the question “why donate blood,” people have many different responses. Some do it because they feel it is the right thing to do. Others may know someone who might need blood. Still, regardless of matter what the reason is, people […]

Taking Pride in Our Faculty

Taking Pride in Our Faculty

By Shayla Simmons
Over one year ago, Sandra Long Weaver agreed to advise The Meter, the student-run newspaper on the TSU campus. Beginning her legacy at TSU with only two students, she helped re-establish the newspaper read and loved by the student body. However even before stepping into her position as advisor, Long Weaver constructed an exceptional legacy and carved her mark in history.
Beginning in her college days at the University of Maryland, Long Weaver worked for the Black Explosion, a student-run newspaper serving the black community at the university.  She served as a reporter and editor until her graduation in 1974, where she walked away with her B.S in Journalism.
Following graduation, Long Weaver worked for The Wilmington, DE News-Journal, then the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin and finally The Philadelphia Inquirer in 1984. Here she began as a news reporter but worked through the ranks, receiving promotion after promotion, until she became the first female African American Managing Editor for the publication.
Other titles she held during her long and fruitful journalism career included Deputy Managing editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer from 2005 to 2007, Managing editor for the Philadelphia Newspapers, LLC and the Philadelphia Inquirer from 2007 to 2008 and, in 2008, Long Weaver was named the Vice President of newsroom operations for Philadelphia Media Holdings. Here she worked with both The Inquirer and The Philadelphia Daily News newsrooms.
While recently reminiscing about her experiences, from being a budding professional journalist to becoming a well-seasoned executive, Long Weaver talked about the uphill battle she faced.
As both a woman and an African American, she remembers having to prove herself time and time again in a career field that was largely dominated by white men. It was this that fueled her passion to assist and mentor young women much like herself to reach great heights in the field.
Even after retirement, Long Weaver began working with the Tennessee Tribune where she created the video project called “Take 10 on Tuesdays,” featuring prominent African American figures in the Nashville area.
 Long Weaver also carries the impressive feat of being a founding member of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ). She is one of 11 women who were part of the 44 founders of the 41-year-old organization.
Ada Taylor, the 2016-2017 Editor-in-Chief under her tutelage, says “We appreciate the fact that she pushes us, and recognize how lucky we are to have her.” With her accumulation of experience, Long Weaver seems to inspire the staff to produce the best possible content.

A Junior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Shayla self identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

TSU Holds First Sadie Hawkins Dance

TSU Holds First Sadie Hawkins Dance

By Christina Young Staff Writer Love is in the air as Tennessee State University holds its very first Sadie Hawkins, hosted by The Women’s Center.  The Sadie Hawkins Dance is usually an informal dance sponsored by a high school, middle school or college, in which […]