Tennessee State University

Author: Shayla Simmons

Are Millenials More Passive Than Previous Generations?

Are Millenials More Passive Than Previous Generations?

When it comes to millennials, a new term has been coined – political dropouts. When considering this term, it forces one to ask his or herself a couple of questions. 1) “Is it true?” and 2) “If it is true, why?” If we assume that […]

TSU Blood Drive Allows Students to Help Others

TSU Blood Drive Allows Students to Help Others

By Victoria Gourdin When asked the question “why donate blood,” people have many different responses. Some do it because they feel it is the right thing to do. Others may know someone who might need blood. Still, regardless of matter what the reason is, people […]

Taking Pride in Our Faculty

Taking Pride in Our Faculty

By Shayla Simmons
Over one year ago, Sandra Long Weaver agreed to advise The Meter, the student-run newspaper on the TSU campus. Beginning her legacy at TSU with only two students, she helped re-establish the newspaper read and loved by the student body. However even before stepping into her position as advisor, Long Weaver constructed an exceptional legacy and carved her mark in history.
Beginning in her college days at the University of Maryland, Long Weaver worked for the Black Explosion, a student-run newspaper serving the black community at the university.  She served as a reporter and editor until her graduation in 1974, where she walked away with her B.S in Journalism.
Following graduation, Long Weaver worked for The Wilmington, DE News-Journal, then the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin and finally The Philadelphia Inquirer in 1984. Here she began as a news reporter but worked through the ranks, receiving promotion after promotion, until she became the first female African American Managing Editor for the publication.
Other titles she held during her long and fruitful journalism career included Deputy Managing editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer from 2005 to 2007, Managing editor for the Philadelphia Newspapers, LLC and the Philadelphia Inquirer from 2007 to 2008 and, in 2008, Long Weaver was named the Vice President of newsroom operations for Philadelphia Media Holdings. Here she worked with both The Inquirer and The Philadelphia Daily News newsrooms.
While recently reminiscing about her experiences, from being a budding professional journalist to becoming a well-seasoned executive, Long Weaver talked about the uphill battle she faced.
As both a woman and an African American, she remembers having to prove herself time and time again in a career field that was largely dominated by white men. It was this that fueled her passion to assist and mentor young women much like herself to reach great heights in the field.
Even after retirement, Long Weaver began working with the Tennessee Tribune where she created the video project called “Take 10 on Tuesdays,” featuring prominent African American figures in the Nashville area.
 Long Weaver also carries the impressive feat of being a founding member of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ). She is one of 11 women who were part of the 44 founders of the 41-year-old organization.
Ada Taylor, the 2016-2017 Editor-in-Chief under her tutelage, says “We appreciate the fact that she pushes us, and recognize how lucky we are to have her.” With her accumulation of experience, Long Weaver seems to inspire the staff to produce the best possible content.
TSU Holds First Sadie Hawkins Dance

TSU Holds First Sadie Hawkins Dance

By Christina Young Staff Writer Love is in the air as Tennessee State University holds its very first Sadie Hawkins, hosted by The Women’s Center.  The Sadie Hawkins Dance is usually an informal dance sponsored by a high school, middle school or college, in which […]

Annual Women of Legend and Merit Awards Mar. 21

Annual Women of Legend and Merit Awards Mar. 21

By Leona Dunn, News Editor The 10th annual Women of Legend and Merit Awards ceremony will be held March 21, at 7 pm in the Tennessee State University Gentry Complex. Actress Vivica A. Fox will be the evening’s special guest and entertainment provided by Angela […]

Taylor’s Success Gained by Time at Tennessee State

Taylor’s Success Gained by Time at Tennessee State

By Christina Young
Staff Writer
Neysa Taylor, former Meter Editor at Tennessee State University and the current  Director of Communications at the Tennessee Department of Corrections, came to visit and discussed her time as a student here at Tennessee State University and how her passion for news made her into the successful women she is today.
In 1993, during Taylor’s first semester at TSU, she decided to major in Mass Communications.  This eventually led to an internship with Channel 4, where one of the first stories she covered was a fire that occurred on campus at Watsons Hall.
Ms. Taylor also spoke about how there were many times when she was the only black person in the newsroom. In this way, she says that “Diverse values have always been a passion of mine. I love telling the story that’s untold. I love being the voice of the voiceless. “ She believes that just because something isn’t part of your world, it doesn’t make it not newsworthy. Taylor’s passion for diversity motivated her to uncover stories for other stations as well, such as Channel  5, where she worked for 15 years.
Nesysa Taylor now works at the Corrections office and loves helping the misunderstood. In this regard she believes that there are too many people surface dwelling who do not take the time to know what’s really going on, and her position at the Department of Corrections helps to change that.
Taylor ended by saying that she works harder now than she ever has in her life.  She advises people to go out and prosper. Go be great.  She believes no job is too small.  She enjoys working hard and says she doesn’t like to be comfortable. “I like to run, I like to stretch, I like to grow, I like to be at the table. I am ambitious to a fault, and it all started here at TSU.”
North Nashville History Preserved on the Plaza

North Nashville History Preserved on the Plaza

By Lavenia Chappel NASHVILLE, TN — Originally a footpath from the Cumberland River to the Hadley Plantation, Jefferson Street was once known as one of America’s best known districts of jazz, rhythm and blues. It served as the home to artists such as Little Richard, […]

Great Debate Takes Place Between Two Institutions

Great Debate Takes Place Between Two Institutions

By Ada Taylor, Editor in Chief Tennessee State University was founded in 1912 and Vanderbilt University was founded in 1873. For the past 105 years, these two institutions have educated students less than three miles from each other, and yet the schools’ forensics teams have […]

TSU Graduate Jackson is the New Mr. Clean

TSU Graduate Jackson is the New Mr. Clean

By Raven Ashlee Mosely-Hall
Staff Writer
Mr. Clean has cleaned himself up and become a new man! TSU graduate Mike Jackson has replaced the iconic cartoon of the tall, handsome man dressed in all white with a single gold hoop earring, after 59 years. Procter & Gamble held a contest looking for the new Mr. Clean, and after hundreds of videos were submitted, they selected fellow TSU Tiger Mike Jackson.
Mike graduated from TSU in 2003. While here he went to every home football game and while in high school in Atlanta, he played the sport himself. He majored in Marketing, and now he works in Sports Marketing.
Jackson made his debut in a commercial during the Super Bowl. “I’m a big football fan so being at the Super Bowl is pretty incredible,” said Jackson, who spent the week on radio row in his Mr. Clean garb doing interviews for the product. “I was really excited when I heard that would be my first duty as Mr. Clean. I can’t wait to see what else they have in store for me the rest of the year.”
Mr. Clean still has the slick bald head, gold earring and the tight white shirt we all know and love. But Mr. Jackson is different because he’s adding diversity to the brand, and quite frankly, can even help with the image of black men and how they are depicted. Mike is making us proud.
Getting Rid of the Stigma of HIV/AIDS to Find a Cure

Getting Rid of the Stigma of HIV/AIDS to Find a Cure

By Leona Dunn News Editor “What person goes to Kroger’s, gets stuck and starves to death? That is exactly what we are doing; we are in a world where we have everything we need to survive. So let’s eat,” T. K. Hampton told over 200 […]