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Author: Shayla Simmons

TSU Celebrates Dr. King’s Legacy

TSU Celebrates Dr. King’s Legacy

  Shayla SimmonsA Junior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Shayla self identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

What March for Our Lives Means for the Future of Black Lives Matter

What March for Our Lives Means for the Future of Black Lives Matter

By Shayla Simmons Editor-in-Chief The young leaders of the March for Our Lives movement accomplished much in little time, leading a protest both online and in person that garnered international attention, celebrity endorsements and an outstanding wave of support. It has been an impressive feat […]

Former TSU Football Player Eligible to Return to School

Former TSU Football Player Eligible to Return to School

The football team of Tennessee State University made headlines in November after a video went viral of former defensive end, Latrelle Lee, punching strength coach, T.J. Greenstone, who was responsible for keeping players away from the sideline to avoid a penalty. The viral video showed Lee hitting the coach multiple times, knocking Greenstone to the ground. The altercation took place on Nov. 11, during Senior Night and the last home game of the season at Hale stadium, located on the campus against Southeast Missouri.

An extended version of the confrontation was later released, shedding more light on the situation. The altercation resulted in Lee being removed from the team for “improper misconduct” and reportedly expelled from the school. Lee, 22, was a senior Criminal Justice major at TSU and only a few weeks shy of graduating on Dec. 9.

Lee made an attempt to appeal the expulsion decision soon after. Students rallied behind him and his decision by supporting the social media campaign “Give Lee His Degree” on both Instagram and Twitter. Lee’s close friend and student at Tennessee State University, Amani Moreland, conceived the movement.

The original Instagram post had the caption, “Latrelle Lee, an early graduate, was set to walk the stage December 9, 2017. He would have graduated in three and a half years with a 3.1 GPA and a degree in Criminal Justice. During his time at Tennessee State University, he acquired an internship in his field and was a student leader in Every Nation Campus Ministries. He held small groups in his campus apartment and helped lead his teammates through their walk with Christ. His classmates know him as mild mannered, kind, funny, and dedicated. Saturday night, his emotions got the best of him and Latrelle made a mistake. However, that moment does not accurately portray the man he is. With less than three weeks until graduation, he is too close to the end to not see it through. Let Latrelle graduate with the degree he has worked so hard to earn. The mistake does not make the man. #GiveLeeHisDegree”.

Twitter user @Kii_Danielle posted, “#GiveLeeHisDegree He’s such a nice young man; always the first one to smile and help others. Truly one of the finest examples of compassion and generosity here at Tennessee State University. He deserves his degree.”

While students of TSU were on Thanksgiving break, a warrant was issued for Lee’s arrest on Nov. 20 and charges were filed. Lee was charged with one count of aggravated assault causing serious bodily injury. The following day, Lee posted a $7,500 bond and was released.

“Once struck about the face by the defendant, the victim fell to the ground and was dazed and somewhat unconscious from the punches. The victim has subsequently been having medical difficulties as a result from the altercation,” according to an arrest affidavit.

Latrelle Lee is eligible to return to Tennessee State University in August of this year. Lee’s official court date is March 12.

Yet a startling parallel can be drawn between Lee’s situation and the latest recruit to the TSU football team. The university has accepted a new transfer student, Mekhi Brown, former linebacker for the University of Alabama.

Brown recently made headlines for his actions on the sideline during the National Championship against the University of Georgia. The 6-foot-5, 240 pound sophomore hit an opposing player on the head and lunged at a coach, attempting to attack him. Despite these engagements, Brown was not dismissed from the team, ejected from the game, or even benched. Rather, Brown was permitted to stay in the game.

According to The Tennessean, Brown’s transfer to TSU was approved in advance, having applied and been admitted more than a month before the altercation.

Mekhi Brown has officially joined the Tiger’s football team as a redshirt sophomore and will be participating in spring practice as well as being eligible to play in the upcoming season.

A Junior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Shayla self identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

Changes Made to Greek Membership Intake at TSU

Changes Made to Greek Membership Intake at TSU

Hazing has become a real threat at colleges and universities across the nation. Headlines broadcasting the result of such a dangerous trend have unfortunately become commonplace. While not only hazardous and potentially fatal, hazing is also a liability for the schools themselves. Hazing is described […]

A Year in Trump’s America

A Year in Trump’s America

A year has passed since the inauguration of the 45th president of the United States, swearing Donald John Trump into the highest office in the land. Even before his official term began, his road to the White House was highly reported and scrutinized for numerous […]

Net Neutrality and You

Net Neutrality and You

A hot button issue as 2017 came to a close was the Federal Communications Commission’s decision to end Net Neutrality in a 3:2 vote on Dec. 14. The outrage leading up to the vote was obvious with people rallying together to voice their dissatisfaction with protests and petitions. Now the questions remains as to how this decision is going to affect the way we use the Internet and what we can expect in 2018.

Net neutrality, as explained by USA Today, is the principle that Internet service providers (ISPs) should give consumers access to all legal content and applications on an equal basis without favoring some sources or blocking others. It also prohibits ISPs from charging content providers for speedier delivery of their content on “fast lanes” and deliberately slowing the content from content providers that may compete with ISPs.

Under the protections of net neutrality, which have only been in effect since 2015, Internet users have open, equal access to what the web has to offer. For example, Verizon could not show favoritism to Yahoo and AOL, which it owns, by blocking users from accessing Google or forcing them to pay a fee to connect its customers. Now that the Internet has been deregulated, such tactics would be legal so long as Verizon makes their customers aware.

The fear for those that use the Internet personally (read: everyone) is that the deregulation of net neutrality will lead to a surge in prices to use websites that have become commonplace. Such distress is not unwarranted as many look to how countries without the protection of net neutrality function, such as Portugal.

The Portuguese Internet system found itself in the spotlight when Rep. Ro Khanna (D-Fremont) brought attention to it in a tweet that quickly went viral on Oct. 26. The Twitter post attached a picture of Portuguese Telecommunications Company, mobile Internet service options.

On top of a basic monthly rate, subscribers to MEO could purchase add-ons for additional services, each averaging out to about $6 for 10GB of data. For each additional service, users can access apps that fall under that particular category. With “messaging” users can access instant messaging apps, Apple’s FaceTime and Skype; “social” allows for the use of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, and so on; the “Video” category covers YouTube, Netflix, Hulu, and so forth; “music” permits the use of Spotify, Pandora, and things of the like; the last category is “email and cloud” (Gmail, Apple’s iCloud, etc.).

Seeing such a different (and costly) alternative has many wondering what can be done to overturn the FCC’s decision before anyone see any noticeable differences.

The battle for net neutrality has become a legal matter. In Congress, Sen. Ed Markey (D- Mass.) has already announced plans to challenge the FCC’s decision to deregulate Internet protections via the Congressional Review Act.

To effectively overturn the decision, the vote would require a majority in both the House and the Senate. If successful, net neutrality protections will be restored. But, that will be easier said than done since a Republican majority currently rules both the House and the Senate. New York’s Attorney General, Eric Schneiderman (Dem.), will also be filing a multistate lawsuit against the FCC.

Yet if a bill is passed supporting the end of Internet protections the damage can be long lasting. To undo legislation would be far more difficult and time consuming, requiring Congress to vote something into law.

With each of these acts to reinstate former Obama-era protections being extremely new, any major change is still to come. No major modifications to the Internet, as we know it shall be seen anytime soon but we must remain vigilant as the year continues.

A Junior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Shayla self identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

The Power of the Black Vote

The Power of the Black Vote

“Three hundred years of humiliation, abuse and deprivation cannot be expected to find voice in a whisper,” Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote in his book Why We Can’t Wait. More than three hundred years later, the voice of the black community, once a whisper, […]

The Double Standard of Drugs: When Weed Sees Color

The Double Standard of Drugs: When Weed Sees Color

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve heard the news that marijuana is big business. Weed has become an industry all on its own, creating overnight millionaires whether it be growing or selling and everything in between. According to Forbes, North America spent a […]

Republican Senators Use Nuclear Weapon

Republican Senators Use Nuclear Weapon

By Ada Taylor

Editor-in-Chief

On Thursday, April 6th, the Senate triggered a policy known as the nuclear option that makes it possible to break a filibuster. It all took place over President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch, who many Democrats feel is unsuited for the job.
This is because “he always sides with corporations instead of people” says Leah Grey, senior. Other reasons include his support for the death penalty, his promotion of gun rights, and his judicial philosophy in general.
This was enough to make Democrats decide a filibuster was necessary. For those who do not know, the Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a filibuster as “the use of extreme dilatory tactics (as by making long speeches) in an attempt to delay or prevent action, especially in a legislative assembly.
As we know, the Democratic filibuster was unsuccessful and Neil Gorsuch was confirmed due to the nuclear option. It was given this name because it is supposed to be the last resort.  The nuclear option makes it possible for the majority party in the Senate to ignore the minority by shifting the rules so that a nominee can be confirmed as long as they have the majority of votes, which is 51. Previously, 60 votes were required.
As bad as this is, too many politicians are playing the blame game instead of looking at the big picture. Instead, they are focusing on how Democrats used the nuclear option in 2013 to advance lower court and executive branch nominees. Now Senator Rand Paul is saying “Harry Reid decided that executive nominations will be done by simple majority, and we just simply went with the Harry Reid rule today.”
Still, it is not quite the same thing. While Democrats did indeed invoke the nuclear option, it was for lower court nominees – not the highest in the land. I am afraid that we have now entered a new age of politics which allows the majority party to clear Supreme Court nominees with little to no bipartisan support.  This means that the Supreme Court is now in the hands of the majority party, with the minority party getting no input.
While it may be the Democrats today, it could be the Republicans tomorrow – and neither is good.

A Junior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Shayla self identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

President Trump’s Russian Relations

President Trump’s Russian Relations

By Ada Taylor On Monday, March 20th, the directors of the NSA and FBI testified before The House Intelligence Community. While the conversation was not limited to one topic, much of the time was spent covering Russian interference in the 2016 election. FBI director James […]