Serving Tennessee State University and the Nashville Community Since 1950

Author: Sandra Long

TSU Bleeds Blue at the NAAAHP Conference

TSU Bleeds Blue at the NAAAHP Conference

By Shayla Simmons Meter Staff Writer Students from HBCUs and PWIs alike participated in the 24th annual NAAAHP (National Association of African American Honors Programs) Conference from Oct. 31 through Nov. 2 at the Grand Opry Gaylord Resort. The students had a chance to network, […]

Student Journalists Have Much to Learn

Student Journalists Have Much to Learn

By Leona Dunn Meter Staff Writer Reginald Stuart, a native of Nashville and a Tennessee State University alumni and retired journalist, posed questions to Meter staffers on Oct. 26 to make them think about what they need to know to be successful in the journalism […]

TSU Alumni Lewis Shares Meter Memories

TSU Alumni Lewis Shares Meter Memories

Former TSU Tiger and retired editor at The Tennessean, Dwight Lewis, visited his old  stomping grounds to meet with the current staff of The Meter
Former TSU Tiger and retired editor at The Tennessean, Dwight Lewis, visited his old
stomping grounds to meet with the current staff of The Meter


By Shayla Simmons
Meter Staff Writer

The Meter staff was presented with a special treat thanks to their advisor, Sandra Long Weaver. Tennessee State University alumni, Mr. Dwight Lewis, graced the staff with personal anecdotes as well as words of wisdom. With an extensive list of accomplishments, such as 40 years with The Tennessean, safely tucked under his belt, Lewis served as an untapped treasure trove of information.

As a native to Tennessee, Knoxville to be exact, Lewis enrolled at TSU in the fall of 1965. Though he majored in business administration on paper, he admittedly partook in the partying scene and pursued dreams of being a professional baseball player, causing Lewis to graduate in the spring of 1971. Despite this, Lewis favorably looks back at his time spent at Tennessee State where he even served as the editor of The Meter.

Dwight Lewis shares writing tips with Meter Managing Editor Taylor Powell
Dwight Lewis shares writing tips with Meter Managing Editor Taylor Powell

Utilizing the skills honed as a staff member, Lewis reflected back on his time with The Tennessean, from which he has since retired.  Entering as a “general assignment reporter” and retiring as editor of the editorial page, the alumni provided insight on his journey as a journalist. “Everything I’ve learned about journal writing I learned from Otis Redding and Aretha Franklin: you want people to feel as though they’re listening to good music,” reiterated from Roy Peter Clark, a former mentor.

Dwight Lewis, Sandra Long Weaver, The Meter Advisor and Reginald Stuart, journalist
Dwight Lewis, Sandra Long Weaver, The Meter Advisor and Reginald Stuart, journalist

Lewis also shared tips to column writing. Explaining that a column differed from an editorial due to the content showcasing personal opinions, Lewis shared the advice of Robert Maner that guided his writing. “The first thing is to know your subject. Secondly, don’t be afraid to say what you want and be willing to take whatever comes from it. Lastly, and most importantly, listen”.

After sharing a few more stories as well as laughs, Lewis left The Meter staff with this piece of advice: “Say it stronger.”

The guest speaker for The Meter on October 5, 2015 was photographer and The Tennessee Tribune's Graphic Designer PJ Fischer (far left). She discussed with The Meter staff how to take print-quality photos with their cell phones.
The guest speaker for The Meter on October 5, 2015 was photographer and The Tennessee Tribune’s Graphic Designer PJ Fischer (far left). She discussed with The Meter staff how to take print-quality photos with their cell phones.
Soul Fire Brings Poetry to Tennessee State

Soul Fire Brings Poetry to Tennessee State

By Leona Dunn Meter Staff Writer On Wednesdays at 5 p.m. in Room 103 in the Humanities building, you can hear all kinds of voices illuminating the halls with poetry. Soul Fire, a poetry workshop was started last year by five students after a day […]

Campus Safety Plan Unveiled

Campus Safety Plan Unveiled

TSU NEWS SERVICE — President Glenda Glover unveiled a 10-point safety plan during a press conference on Oct. 30. At press time, the shooter still had not been identified. The investigation had expanded to Memphis. The 10-point plan emphasizes a partnership with Metro Nashville Police […]

Campus Unites, Moves Forward

Campus Unites, Moves Forward

Racia Poston and Brett Jackson, president and vice president of student  government association, listen to students concerns
Racia Poston and Brett Jackson, president and vice president of student
government association, listen to students concerns
Tennessee State students link arm in arm cutting off traffic by the front gate to pray and send a message letting the campus know that they are serious about change
Tennessee State students link arm in arm cutting off traffic by the front gate to pray and send a message letting the campus know that they are serious about change

By Leona Dunn
Meter Staff Writer

Tennessee State University Administration and Faculty did not waste time to address the concerns of students following the Oct. 22 shooting on the campus. On Friday, Oct. 23, a prayer service was held where Student Government Association President Racia Poston spoke, along with University President Glenda Glover, and Mount Zion Pastor Joseph Walker.

“Remind the students why they are here, they came here for an education. Hopefully this does not divide the campus but brings them closer together because this is a time where we all need each other’s love and prayers,” Rev. Walker said.

One male was killed and three females were injured, two shot and one grazed by a bullet during the late-night shooting which after a dice game went wrong near the student center. Former student Cameron Selmon was killed during the shooting.

“While walking back to Hale passing the old courtyard, all of a sudden I heard gunshots, next thing I know I’m running, there’s people tripping over each other and all I could hear was screams,” freshman Oneshia Evans said.

An emergency town hall meeting was called on Friday, Oct. 23 as well. The students discussed what they believed should be done as the campus moves forward. Shootings have happened too often at the university and emotions where high as students piled into the room with solutions and testimonies.

“Last night I asked a security guard didn’t three students just get shot and he said yeah, then I asked so why aren’t you checking ID’s?” He then responded oh most people that come here are students, and I’m asking but what if I’m not a student. I’m asking him why doesn’t  he care, it’s like they don’t care. I have never heard gunshots before I came to TSU,” sophomore, Kalynn Parks said, “ If you have this job you get paid to do this you signed up to do this nobody told you to do it, you wanted this job, so take this job serious cause I take my life serious and I didn’t come here to die.”

At the meeting students charged the student body, TSU administration, and Nashville government to all take a part in creating a safer community on campus. Talk of enforcing check points, fencing the campus, finding out how to create unity in the student body, having foot patrols, and even opening up a recreational setting for kids to have a productive place to go after 10pm at night were all discussed during the town hall.

“That could have been you out there in that courtyard, that could have been your friend, you all should be heated, you all should be mad cause now it’s not a Nashville problem it’s a TSU problem, this is up to us if you think someone’s going to come on campus and make everything okay that’s not going to happen until we step up,” Poston said.

Shootings Bring Unwanted Spotlight to TSU

Shootings Bring Unwanted Spotlight to TSU

By  J. Michaux Meter Staff Writer Recent shootings on and adjacent to the campus of Tennessee State University have thrust the HBCU into the national limelight. Students and alumni have taken to social media proclaiming #IAMTSU and #PRAYFORTSU. The first shooting during Homecoming Week took […]

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Dear Editor, Imagine this scene: It was unusually warm for an October night. I had just gotten off of work and I was feeling good knowing I was about to see my girlfriend, even if all we were going to do was study in the […]

EDITORIAL

EDITORIAL

AshleyParmer-Editor in ChiefBy Ashley Parmer,
Editor in Chief

I would like to take a moment to analyze the shooting on Oct. 22, 2015 in which Cameron Selmon lost his life and three females were injured, and offer my thoughts on the situation.

Thoughts on the Incident

I am saddened by the death that took place on TSU’s campus. And my heart goes out to those who were innocently walking by that night. However, I do wonder why a gambling game was even allowed to take place at a school that holds “gambling of any form” as a violation as stated in the TSU Police Department Handbook. Because of this game, things got out of hand.

Thoughts on the Media

My university president’s name is Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover. Not Linda. As a fellow journalist, I know that accuracy is important. Dr. Glover has been in office long enough and TSU has been on the news enough for a reporter to know her name. Now that I have cleared that up, I can move on.

I was surprised to see that my school had made it to CNN, Good Morning America and the Today Show. But I was even more surprised that it took a tragedy to get us that type of coverage. As people say about the media, “If it bleeds, it leads.” I would also like to commend Channel 5 for posting a positive story about TSU on the same day as these awful stories surfaced.

Thoughts on the School

We need to all be watchful of what’s going on, and we need to all work together. How can we work together to cut down on this crime? Should we beef up more security, or should we be aware and report those things that are occur on campus?

Thoughts on the Students

I am disappointed in the reactions students took to the fight that happened just before the shooting. Why would you choose to record the fight instead of call the police to report the problem? Using this as a time to grab entertainment led to injuries and death.

On another note, I am glad that we can unite in times of tragedy and stand strong. I am also glad that we can promote the positive sides of our school. But for how long? I have spotted the #ThisWontMakeittotheNews on several Instagram posts to highlight the accomplishments of TSU, but I only see these things as an in-the-moment trend. Where is the consistency? Promote TSU 365 days a year not just on the day of a shooting. How often do you really support the great things our school have done? And how often do you guys watch/read the news? Do you all really know what makes it to the news?

These are my thoughts, you may agree and you may not. I’d like to hear from you on what you think about the campus shooting.

Women’s Track & Field’s Former Coach Temple Honored

Women’s Track & Field’s Former Coach Temple Honored

By Carlos Mavins Jr. NASHVILLE — Three, Two, One, BANG! The empire raises his hand and fires a gunshot. As the 1960 Olympic Track & Field event for women in the 100meter dash took place. Minutes later, athlete Wilma Rudolph stormed across the finish line […]