Serving Tennessee State University and the Nashville Community Since 1950

Month: December 2016

College Sunday held by Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church

College Sunday held by Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church

By Rheya Traylor On November 13, 2016, Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church held their annual College Sunday service in Tennessee State University’s Gentry Complex. Starting at 11:15 am, each song, performance, and message were dedicated to college students across Tennessee. The congregation consisted of many […]

Doing Nothing Against Injustice Promotes Abuse, Prominent Civil Rights Attorney Says

Doing Nothing Against Injustice Promotes Abuse, Prominent Civil Rights Attorney Says

By Emmanuel Freeman NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service) — A prominent civil rights attorney says that those who see injustice and do nothing help to promote abuse. Benjamin Crump, the Florida lawyer who represented families in police shooting cases that made headlines around the world, […]

Even the Most Adjusted Students Can Be Homesick

Even the Most Adjusted Students Can Be Homesick

By Rayvin Ashlee Mosley-Hall
No matter how excited you are for the parties, games, and organizations, even the most independent college student can find themselves homesick. Whether you’re a freshman or a senior, it happens to everyone. There’s no medical definition for homesickness, but according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, “Homesickness in it’s most basic form is thoughts and feeling about home, but it exists on a continuum—it isn’t a matter of being of homesick or not; it’s matter of degree,” says Dr. Klapow. “This means that however mild or infrequent your thoughts about home are, you can still be considered homesick.” In its severe state, homesickness can cause you to have obsessive thoughts about home, crying at random times and the inability to come to college and do what you’re supposed to do—go to classes, make friends, find yourself and of course, earn your degree. People make the mistake of thinking being homesick means that you miss your home, but it’s really about missing what’s comfortable. Homesickness is a longing for familiarity.
1. Accept what you’re going through, and understand it’s normal. There is nothing wrong with taking a minute to adjust to a new place, or missing what’s familiar. It happens to all of us, even if we don’t want to admit it. Chances are, a lot of your friends are going through it but won’t talk about it. So whether you’re in a new city for school, a job, or you just wanted a fresh start, if you find yourself feeling homesick you can immediately work towards getting through it.
2. Get used to your new surroundings. Make college your home away from home. According to Dr. Kaplow, the core of homesickness is being uncomfortable with the unfamiliar. So take a walk around your campus and explore your surroundings. Find cool spots to hang out, study or even create your own private spot where you can go to clear your head. Don’t just make your room your happy place, as the more you make the campus “yours” the more comfortable you’ll become.
3. Don’t dwell on your high school self, time to rebuild yourself and find out who you really are. It’s okay if you were the popular kid that everyone knew in high school, but when you get to college it’s not exactly the same. It’s not about being well-known, it’s about feeling at home and being sure of yourself. The discomfort of not knowing everything and everyone around you may throw you off, but continuously working to get comfortable can make your feelings of homesickness settle down.
4. Stay connected to home, but not too connected. Staying connected with your friends and family helps you to miss them less, and talking to them a few times a week or even once a day is always okay. Still, don’t go overboard. Part of getting settled in is getting used to living differently. Touching base with home every now and again helps, but don’t be afraid to branch out and experience new people.
5. Stay positive! “Many college students don’t give themselves time to deal with homesickness,” says Dr. Klapow. “Homesickness is uncomfortable, but for the most part, you’re fine.” Don’t let homesickness take over. Adjusting to new surroundings and trying to juggle academics is a challenge at first, and that’s normal. Still, don’t forget what you came to school for and just keep pushing.
Most students will experience some form of homesickness, however, it is very important that you pay attention to yourself. With many students, homesickness can trigger anxiety or even depression. If you feel as if these feelings are arising, keep a log of days when you’re in a homesick daze. Those days when you’re really not feeling or acting like yourself, ask yourself questions such as, “Have I been homesick for more than 3 days or so?” or “Am I still able to fulfill my responsibilities such as going to class, club meetings etc.?” It is rare for homesickness to turn into something more serious but if you need additional help please be sure seek it out.
Remember, homesickness is normal. We all have lonely days, especially our freshman year, but make sure to stay positive and look forward to all of the awesome things that have yet to come.

A Junior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Shayla self identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

TSU’s College of Business Hosts Global Leadership Summit for Top Business Students

TSU’s College of Business Hosts Global Leadership Summit for Top Business Students

By Lucas Johnson NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service) — Tennessee State University’s College of Business has a directive for its students: “Write your signature on the world.” Dr. Millicent Lownes-Jackson, the College’s dean, said that charge inspired the recent Global Leadership Summit for its top […]

50th Anniversary of Kwanzaa

50th Anniversary of Kwanzaa

By Victoria Gourdin For those who celebrate it, Kwanzaa is a Pan-African holiday recognized by millions throughout the world and African community. It gives a different cultural message to a community surrounded by only Christianity’s version of the season. It teaches what it means to […]

What the Women’s Center is All About

What the Women’s Center is All About

by Knija Kendrick
You may know where the women center is located, but not really know what goes down behind that door. I spoke to Seanne Wilson, the woman in charge, and a few of the ladies who help out, about what the women center is really all about.
“At the beginning of the school year, we give out pearls to the freshmen girls and we offer condoms and tampons. This is a place where women can come and get help on their individual needs or if they just need people to talk to,” Freshmen Makayla McCree said. “For me, it’s a place I can call home being that I’m 9 hours and 30 minutes away from home, so being in a place where people care and can relate to the emotions you are going through is amazing to me.”
All the girls agreed that the women’s center is a place where they can voice their concerns about what goes on in their personal lives and school. Being a part of the women’s center makes them feel like people care about them.
“Nobody in here judges each other,” freshman Lyndia Walker said. “Students, faculty, and staff can also come in and get clothes that were donated by Alumni. It’s a safe place and home away from home where you can come in and relax and do your homework or even get help with any homework.”
It’s also a place where you can learn new things. “We learned about what Lupus was and you can also learn about new events. It’s basically like an information center,” freshman class representative, Jasha Keller said.
They also recently made a twitter and Instagram page to reach out to other women who may not know about the Women’s Center and get them involved in some of the events they host. “We realize that we did not have any social media pages and all we had was this room, but not many people know about it, so we realized to get the word out we need to cater to students. Most students are on twitter and Instagram for easier access,” Jasha Keller said. Even if it’s just stopping by for a little chat or grabbing some personal items, stop by the Women’s Center at any time!

A Junior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Shayla self identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

TSU Police Chief Attends National Conference on Gun Policies

TSU Police Chief Attends National Conference on Gun Policies

By Lucas Johnson NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service) — Tennessee State University Police Chief Greg Robinson is attending a national conference this week with about 20 other top campus law enforcement officials to discuss campus-carry policies. The conference, sponsored by the National Center for Campus […]

I Voted for Trump

I Voted for Trump

By Leona Dunn “I understand that voting for trump may seem unprecedented at an HBCU,” Marvin Williamson said, “but I know I’m not the only one who did it, even though I may be the only one brave enough to admit to it.” Williamson, a […]

Celebrating Hanukkah

Celebrating Hanukkah

By Rheya Traylor
As we move into the holiday season, it is important to remember the diverse range of holidays that our peers will be celebrating. The Jewish holiday Hanukkah, or Festival of Lights, is celebrated for eight days and nights. This year it will start the evening of December 24th and end the evening of January 1st.  Hanukkah refers to the celebration of Israelites over their Greek ruler approximately 2,200 years ago. The symbol that is usually representative of Hanukkah is the Menorah. This nine-branched candelabrum holds candles. Each night of Hanukkah, a candle is placed from right to left. It is then lit from left to right on the last night and shown in the window of each Jewish home. During this eight-day period, families traditionally eat potato pancakes and jelly doughnuts or other foods that are fried in oil to celebrate the Festival of Light. They will also recite the Hallel, or the psalm of praise.

A Junior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Shayla self identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

Students Share Their Family’s Holiday Traditions

Students Share Their Family’s Holiday Traditions

By Martavious Morton Different holiday traditions have been a part of American families for decades. Here at TSU, the students are all excited for both fall and winter break, especially since a big holiday like Thanksgiving passes. Now with Christmas right around the corner, the […]