Serving Tennessee State University and the Nashville Community Since 1950

Month: December 2016

TSU Celebrated Veterans Day With Ceremony

TSU Celebrated Veterans Day With Ceremony

By K. Dawn Rutledge NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service) — Tennessee State University’s annual Veterans Day ceremony revealed some stark statistics when guest speaker and Vietnam Veteran George Nichols gave a powerful history lesson on military service in the United States. In front of a […]

Collegiate Citizens Police Academy Formed

Collegiate Citizens Police Academy Formed

By Emmanuel Freeman NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service) — Tennessee State University and the Nashville Metro Police Department have formed what’s believed to be the nation’s first Collegiate Citizens Police Academy. Nashville Metro Police Chief Steve Anderson welcomes the new recruits, as TSU Police Chief […]

The Safety in Safety Pins Since the Election

The Safety in Safety Pins Since the Election

By Victoria Gourdin
After the recent election of soon to be president Donald Trump, many people throughout the country are feeling threatened. Already Trump supporters have made derogatory comments to people of color, and one transgender woman even had her car set on fire. Because of that and because of the hate that shrouds minority communities in general, people began to speak out.
Whether as an individual or within an organization, many people have signed petitions, protested and worked towards different solutions. However even with all of the positive moves forward and the steady growth of a unified community, countless American citizens still feel threatened. For these people, it is hard to tell who is available for conversation versus the people who simply increase tensions. With these uncertainties still so prevalent, a new movement has begun.
Throughout the United States, people have donned safety pins to signify that they are and always will be a safe, reliable person to talk to. The pins themselves signify that not all people believe in or support the hateful rhetoric that has been used throughout Mr. Trump’s campaign. However, the soon to be president himself requested that his supporters cease derogatory comments towards minorities. Still, many continued to get out of hand.
For this reason, people are wearing these safety pins as a symbol of unity. After an increase of attacks against immigrants in the United Kingdom, citizens began to wear small safety pins. When hate speech and violence in general began to rise in the States, that symbol spread. When asked for her opinion on this new movement, Senior Paris Booker says that “Anything that brings people together right now is a good thing. Whether or not it’s effective, I don’t know. But I think there are a lot of people who probably appreciate the support.”
As of right now, people throughout the world are wearing safety pins to support the end of violence and hate. Regardless of who you voted for, if you would like to see our country unified again, this may be the movement for you.

A Senior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Self-identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

Engineering Students Checking For Bridge Safety

Engineering Students Checking For Bridge Safety

By Emmanuel Freeman NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service) — Tennessee State University engineering students are helping to ensure that road infrastructures around Nashville are safe. A team of six graduate and undergraduate students, along with their professors from the Departments of Civil and Architectural Engineering, […]

Panel Takes on Global Diversity and Inclusion at TSU Event

Panel Takes on Global Diversity and Inclusion at TSU Event

By Lucas Johnson  NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service) — Students attending a recent event sponsored by Tennessee State University’s Office of International Affairs were encouraged to be “curious of cultures other than your own.” The event, “Where I Come From,” was held Nov. 5 and […]

Election Watch Party Hosted on Campus

Election Watch Party Hosted on Campus

By Khandi Wilson
On Election day, November 8th, 2016, the 76th Administration and SGA hosted a watch party in the Faculty Dining room. Students gathered in the intimate setting for four hours watching both television screens in the room calculating the popular and electoral votes. In the first couple of hours, the atmosphere was relaxed, perhaps even on the verge of excitement.
This social gathering had a mix of things going on, from people being on their phones, voicing their opinions on their predictions, and awaiting the next polls numbers. It truly was an atmosphere that was scared, uncertain, and skeptical about the inevitable outcome – a Trump or Clinton Presidency. As poll numbers continued to pour into the night, conversations emerged where fellow students were educating others on what the electoral college is and its importance, who they voted for and why, and their thoughts on how it was going thus far. People did not know how to feel, how to function, how they were going to govern themselves if the candidate they voted against, won.
When the poll numbers started to go up for Republican Nominee Donald Trump and down for Democratic Nominee Hillary Clinton, the room went into an uproar. People were upset, angry, and shocked that the Electoral College decided on Trump while the popular vote was won by Clinton.
The point of this social gathering was to encourage awareness and conversation here at our university. It was meant to bring us together, not only to gain political knowledge but to inspire us to make a difference where we can, whenever we can. This election and the unity of the school afterward has shown us that by voicing our opinions and rallying together with a common cause, we can work for the betterment of our community and our country.

A Senior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Self-identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

TSU Students Show ‘The Mixed Crowd’

TSU Students Show ‘The Mixed Crowd’

By Alexis Clark “The Mixed Crowd” is a show with a series of 3 episodes that has been created by TSU students. Seniors Adam Turner, Cedric Beene, and Dehjonette Gilmore came up with the idea of the show and were eventually the directors, while the […]

Conference Aims to Help HBCUs Attract More Students

Conference Aims to Help HBCUs Attract More Students

By Emmanuel Freeman NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service) — Historically black colleges and universities are looking for ways to increase enrollment. A group of four HBCU presidents, higher education leaders, innovators and corporate executives met at Tennessee State University Nov. 10 for a one-day conference […]

Honoring Black Excellence Through Weekend of Research, Recreation and Relationships

Honoring Black Excellence Through Weekend of Research, Recreation and Relationships

By Leona Dunn
NAAAHP stands for the National Association of African Americans Honors Program. It started twenty-five years ago when 20 honors college directors met at Morehouse College and had a vision. Which will make the 26th anniversary just as special, going back to where it all began.
“There are so many conferences and award programs that we go to, but none are as intimate or as memorable as the NAAAHP conference,” Carolyn Giggs, a Camlin honors student says. “It’s always a new location, new faces, and an amazing place to showcase our research and what we offer as young black educated students to the world.”
With Recruiters from Harvard, Howard, Vanderbilt, and other Graduate programs coming to meet the students, along with free professional headshots and etiquette training, the conference always has a lot in store for its students. Still, the conference is always hard to schedule. This is mainly because it is during homecoming season, a very important time for alumni and students to come back to their alma maters and celebrate the past and future of our beloved Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This year it landed on Spelman and Morehouse’s scheduled celebration but that did not stop them from showing up and showing out.
“We missed Saturday because of the homecoming game but thank God we were just three hours away because we enjoy coming every year and just being indulged in black excellence. It’s a pleasure to be invited and an adventure every time we come, “ said one Morehouse student.
The students had plenty to do, whether it was roaming the town, attend one another’s research panels, discussions, debates, or the quiz bowl competition. Yet the most exciting part of the conference was electing the new student officials for next year. Tensions rose as students campaigned for the most sought out positions every year, Mr. and Miss NAAAHP.
With over 50 schools represented, four men ran for Mister and six young ladies for Miss, all presenting speeches before voting electronically commenced with Eric Hobsen from Jackson State continuing his reign from last year and Jade Omodara from FAMU taking the crown as Miss.
“I am not going to lie, I didn’t think I was going to win at first but when I found out I almost cried,” Omodara said.
The student activities commenced with a love seminar hosted by Pastor Jackson from Pleasant Green, right here in Nashville on Jefferson Street. Then the annual talent show kicked off the final night of workshops before the Gala ended the conference as a whole the next day.
“We need to give our old relationships an autopsy,” Pastor Jackson advised, “because if we can find out what killed the old ones then we hopefully won’t bring those same diseases into the new one. And this is all relationships whether intimate, friendships or even family ones.”
After that message, talents ranging from monologues, poetry, song, rap and praise dance took over, as the schools showed off their talented tenth. Next, the night was filled with last minute bonding and networking as people packed up and prepped for the Gala the next day.
“I meet amazing people every year here, who I try to keep in touch with. It is important and powerful for us to keep these national connections, one HBCU to another. It forms this unity that’s so enriching and amazing to say you’re a part of,” said Alexyandria Nelson, a Southern University honors student.
 “We are literally sitting next to the next doctors, lawyers, inventors, and media moguls. Literally everyone in this room I already see doing amazing things, making a mark in their schools and communities, and now we’re all in one room together for the last time this year. It’s amazing but it sucks at the same time,” proclaims Kendall Anderson, a honors college student here Tennessee state university.  “We are all looking forward to this conference next year and to even bigger things happening for us in years to come.”

A Senior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Self-identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

An Interview With Ambassador Chacon

An Interview With Ambassador Chacon

By Shayla Simmons For those that have dreams of experiencing new cultures, traveling across continents, and meeting new people of all walks of life, working with the state department may be a viable choice. To get the best information on such an amazing opportunity, the […]