Serving Tennessee State University and the Nashville Community Since 1950

Month: November 2016

101-Year-Old Former TSU Cheerleader  Brunson Named ABC’s ‘Person of the Week’

101-Year-Old Former TSU Cheerleader Brunson Named ABC’s ‘Person of the Week’

By E.Freeman NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service) — Burnece Walker Brunson’s popularity is almost as impressive as her age. The 101-year-old Tennessee State University alumna, who was a member of the then-Tennessee A&I College cheerleading squad in 1934, was ABC World News Tonight’s “Person of the […]

No Limit Records – A Family of Entrepreneurs

No Limit Records – A Family of Entrepreneurs

By Montrose Waite Howard University News Service WASHINGTON, D.C. (Howard News Service) — Beginning in the mid 1990’s, Percy Robert Miller, commonly known as Master P, has been a major player in the music industry, becoming one of the first rappers to own his distribution […]

The T.E. Poag Players Guild Returns to TSU!

The T.E. Poag Players Guild Returns to TSU!

By Martavious Morton
Staff Writer
 
The infamous T.E. Poag Players Guild has returned to TSU! The T.E. Poag Players Guild was originally created as the Tennessee Players Guild in 1931 by Thomas E. Poag, the theater department’s coordinator at the time. It was later named The T.E. Poag Players Guild in 1971. The idea of bringing the organization back after approximately 4 years of absence was brought up by Dr. Lawrence James and two of his senior theater students: Kala Ross and ShaRicka Brown. Both Kala and ShaRicka were originally looking to start a new organization on campus, but after learning of the existence of this previous organization the two decided to reform the T.E. Poag Players Guild to create a new legacy for the organization on campus. The organization’s new mission is to provide a professional challenge for the students of TSU and to prepare them to profit off of their skills in acting and drama. Both Kala and ShaRicka want to create a solid foundation for future students in TSU’s theater department. However, the organization is not only for theater majors as it is open to all majors on TSU’s campus. Kala Ross, President, and ShaRicka Brown, Vice President, both want to leave an amazing legacy behind after they graduate this spring. After all, there is a definite need for the arts, which is why the T.E. Poag Players Guild will be recruiting and encouraging students to get involved in the upcoming years.

A Senior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Self-identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

Livingstone Alumna Dwarf Defies the Odds Through Dance

Livingstone Alumna Dwarf Defies the Odds Through Dance

By Delvakio Brown Staff Writer The world is not equipped to accommodate the needs of every type of human being but MyKesha Smith, a 3’5 dwarf, took on her passion and college anyway.  Experiencing a college campus for the first time can be overwhelming for […]

Secret Cosmetics Taking Over TSU!

Secret Cosmetics Taking Over TSU!

By Rayvin Ashlee Mosley-Hall Staff Writer A junior here at TSU, hailing all the way from Atlanta, Georgia, is making her mark one lip gloss at a time. “TSU is seeing the end product of a storm.” Says Justis McKinney as she tells me her […]

TSU’s Glover Announces Initiatives  to Continue ‘Legacy of Excellence’

TSU’s Glover Announces Initiatives to Continue ‘Legacy of Excellence’

By Lucas Johnson
NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service) — Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover outlined new initiatives she says will continue a “legacy of excellence” at the 104-year-old institution.
Dr. Glover held a press conference on Oct. 14 during Homecoming week to discuss Impact 20/20, which includes new governance, academic excellence, and capital improvement and infrastructure enhancements.
“This is an exciting time for TSU as we celebrate a legacy of pride and progress,” said Glover, referring to this year’s Homecoming theme.
In the area of governance, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam announced two days earlier the eight appointees to the newly created TSU state governing board, which aims to give the university – and the other four-year state institutions – increased autonomy to support student success as the state continues an initiative to have 55 percent of Tennesseans with a degree or credential by 2025.
“We are pleased with the men and women the governor has selected, and look to the leadership of the full General Assembly to approve them,” Glover said.
She also announced TSU is raising its admission standards and enhancing student success initiatives to increase retention and graduation rates. Beginning the fall of 2017, all students must have a 2.5 GPA and a 19 on the ACT for admission to TSU. The previous admission scores were 2.25 or a 19 on the ACT for in-state students, and a 2.5 or 19 ACT for out-of-state students.
“We’re glad that we’re raising the bar here at Tennessee State University,” said Student Government Association President Aarian Forman. “We want to continue to be an institution of great quality. I think the new admission standards will help further this agenda to help us do that.”
The academic component also includes an Executive MBA Program offered through the College of Business next year, as well as establishment of TSU centers for Social Justice and Equality; Economic Policy Institute; Law Enforcement Education; a Center of Excellence for Ethics; and Emergency Management Institute.
As for capital improvement and infrastructure enhancement, Glover announced construction of a new Health Sciences building, as well as plans for new residence halls, an on-campus stadium, and a project that will encompass more than 80 acres along the Cumberland River.
“With a mixed use concept, Cumberland City will be an educational, technology, health, commercial, and residential engine that will allow TSU to be a major participant in the economic boom that is Nashville,” Glover said.
In 2012, TSU contributed $610 million to the Nashville economy, statistics show.
“We’re very proud of the economic value that Tennessee State University brings to the city and to the state,” said state Rep. Brenda Gilmore, whose district includes TSU.
Joni McReynolds, president of TSU’s National Alumni Association, agreed.
“We are so proud of the things TSU is doing, and we’re going to be here to sponsor you, and help raise money,” she said.
Glover also emphasized during the press conference that TSU is continuing to strengthen campus security.
“New Police Chief Greg Robinson has been dedicated to bringing additional enhancement to our Police Department,” she said. “Public safety is paramount, and we will treat it as such.”

A Senior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Self-identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

Tennessee State University, Google Partner to  Help Prepare Students for the Workforce

Tennessee State University, Google Partner to Help Prepare Students for the Workforce

By Lucas Johnson NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service) — Tennessee State University is now a Google School. The institution recently received the designation through a partnership with the technology giant. TSU one of 10 historically black colleges and universities participating in the Google in Residence […]

TSU Hosted National Conference of Honors

TSU Hosted National Conference of Honors

By E. Freeman NASHVILLE, TN (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University hosted the 2016 National Association of African-American Honors Programs Conference Saturday, Oct. 29. The three-day conference included a gala on Monday, Oct. 31 in the Howard C. Gentry Complex on TSU’s main campus. […]

TSU Crime Report

TSU Crime Report

By Leona Dunn
News Editor
Tennessee State University’s crime rate has been excessive when it comes to relatively small infractions such as drug charges and burglary on the campus. Drug possession/ equipment has been the most consistent charge in the monthly crime report with students being caught with pipes and marijuana consistently.  Theft charges typically involve small personal items, such as IDs and wallets.
When it comes to violence only a few simple assault cases have been reported. Nevertheless the Dean of Students, Frank Stevenson, has addressed this issue by stating that all fighting will result in immediate dismissal. He expounds upon this policy by reasoning that college students are too old to still be solving problems through physical confrontation instead of productive verbal communication.
As for sexual crimes/problems or concerns, none have been reported this semester as of now.
Even though these events may come off as minor, the police department still urges students to be more aware and to keep up with their personal things. Also, they would like to remind students that marijuana may be regulated and allowed in some states, but it is still illegal in the state of Tennessee.

A Senior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Self-identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

How Do TSU Students Feel About Voting?

How Do TSU Students Feel About Voting?

By Rheya Traylor Staff Writer In the 2016 Presidential election, the top candidates are Hilary Clinton and Donald Trump. In the eyes of the Tennessee State student body, it is very important to vote this election year. Sophomore Chad Venson says,” If you don’t vote, […]