Serving Tennessee State University and the Nashville Community Since 1950

Month: April 2016

TSU Football Players Teach Kids Importance of Exercise

TSU Football Players Teach Kids Importance of Exercise

By E. Freeman NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The TSU Tigers’ football team recently took time to help some tiger cubs understand the importance of staying fit. The program on April 1 was part of activities planned by the university’s Early Learning Center to […]

Opinion:Think, Work, Serve

Opinion:Think, Work, Serve

By Ada Taylor Meter Staff Writer The motto at Tennessee State University is Think, Work, Serve. Student leaders embody this mantra. For this reason, each candidate running for office participated in community service on the day before the winners of the election were announced.  This […]

Tennessean Editor Inspires Communication Students

Tennessean Editor Inspires Communication Students

By Shayla Simmons
Meter Staff Writer
“I got into the business of journalism to change the world.”
That was how Michael Anastasi, executive editor of The Tennessean, captivated his audience: The Meter staff, as well as interested Mass Communication students and faculty.
Like most other speakers Anastasi began by sharing his professional history, what ignited his passion and drove him to continue on in his rise to greatness. His climb up the professional ladder began early, graduating college at 19.
He began by sharing a satirical anecdote on his first assignment covering the local courthouse, which resulted in an editorial on insufficient police training. Anastasi also shared the recent accomplishment of being awarded a 2015 Pulitzer Prize for local reporting for his Los Angeles team’s yearlong investigation on corruption in the Centinela Valley school district.
Yet Anastasi also made note to orate “the power and importance of journalism.”
“I think that it’s very important for a journalist to stand up for those that can’t be there, that don’t have the power to not only be there, but to speak out,” Anastasi said. A journalist must be able to identify those people, as they exist in every community; to be able to speak for those that cannot speak for themselves, he said.
Aside from his past personal accomplishments, Anastasi also explained his current endeavors, including improving diversity in the field of journalism, beginning with the Tennessean, as well as pushing aspiring journalists to explore digital options, which he believes to be the next frontier for journalists and readers alike.

A Junior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Shayla self identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

The Future is in Our Hands

The Future is in Our Hands

By Ashley Parmer Editor in Chief As Millennials, the future is in our hands. We hear this a lot when it comes to saving our planet and getting an education. But the future truly relies on our vote. In this democratic nation, we control who […]

Opinion:The Generational Gap: The Black Revolution Then and Now

Opinion:The Generational Gap: The Black Revolution Then and Now

By Victoria Gourdin Meter Staff Writer   When talking about a generational gap about issues, it is relatively straight forward.  It is a difference of opinion or outlook between people of different generations. However, many people are quick to disregard the importance of the opinions […]

Freshmen English Introduces ‘The Green Kabaret’

Freshmen English Introduces ‘The Green Kabaret’

By Shayla Simmons
Meter Staff Writer
The freshmen of English 1010 and 1020 presented to TSU their quarterly annual ‘Green Kabaret’. The Green Kabaret is a student-led production with the mission of telling “the critical stories of our time addressing the vulnerabilities of the natural world.” Students use research applied to music, film and theater to convey the urgency to this issue.
Each kabaret features a speaker known for his or her work in the area of enviormental conservation. The speaker for Spring 2016 kabaret is Jordan E. Mazurek, a journalist with Earth First Journal and Prison Legal News and is active in the movement to stop the construction of new prisons on top of toxic coal mining waste sites.
Mazurek will present with special interest to the students to the following majors and departments: English, Criminal Justice, Mass Communications, Art, as well as Agriculture and Environmental Science. By doing so, Mazurek hopes to increase dialogue relevant to the evolving fields of Green Criminology, Sustainable Agriculture, Sustainable Community Planning and Engineering.
The Green Kabaret will be presented in The Forum in the Floyd-Payne Campus Center onThursday, April 21 from 11:00–12:30 p.m. under the supervision of Professor Marsha Williams, Department of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy.

A Junior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Shayla self identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

Next Steps for Miss and Mr. TSU

Next Steps for Miss and Mr. TSU

By Alexis Clark  Meter Staff Writer The clock is ticking; the days are winding down as the school year comes to an end. New candidates will be in office for the 2016-2017 school year with new ideas to make Tennessee State University better and more […]

TSU Leads National Service Project That Continues Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.

TSU Leads National Service Project That Continues Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.

By Lucus Johnson NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is using funding it was awarded to help facilitate a national service initiative involving 10 other higher education institutions in the southeast region. Following a competitive grant process, TSU received $447,000 in June […]

New Era Ushered in for SEC

New Era Ushered in for SEC

By Leona Dunn
Meter Staff Writer
Tennessee State University held its annual SEC week from April 3 to 8. It all began with the previewing of candidates Sunday evening, right before the annual AOB explosion. At this revealing, each candidate introduced themselves and their platforms.
“How do I balance academics and social activities? How do I take the initiative to be great? If you have been battling with these questions I have a solution just for you; How to get away with Success,” newly-elected Junior Vice President Jalexus Parker said, “my platform is to be self-efficient, persistent, inspire, and to be zealous so that operation how to get away with success will be put into full effect.”
 The annual debate occurred April 4, an event that allows students to hear the candidates views on controversial issues on and off campus that directly affect the students and understand not only their platforms but their initiatives to start making TSU live up to its legacy.
“I am so ready for the debate tonight because these elections are not just to see to who has the best food but to see who has the best ideas, and who is actually going to make the change we need to see and continue to be visible after SEC week,” sophomore Tierney Curtis said.
Although there are over 40 positions available on the Student Government Association’s Board, there were less than 30 people running for office.
“The popular categories tend to be president, vice president, Mr. and Miss of all classes and of course representatives at large, but without the secretaries, the treasurers, and the class officers the system doesn’t work,” Jamel Hodges, student activities director, said. “Because now you have presidents and vice presidents trying to handle the money, trying to handle the students, and trying to keep up with everything happening at the meetings and that is not their job.”
“When I relinquish the position next year, I hope to see six men up here running for Mister TSU. Hopefully next year I can be an inspiration, because if JG can stop the partying so much and wear a suit, not every day but at least three times a week, then so can anyone else,” says Jordan Gaither, the newly elected Mr. TSU.
Everyone’s favorite event, the Rally, was held in Gentry on Tuesday. This is where candidates feed both faculty and students by setting up tables to create a unified networking opportunity. This was followed by the pageant on Wednesday where candidates got to showcase their talents before the big vote begins.
“You can have the whole school with you and wanting you to lead, but it doesn’t matter how the majority feels if they don’t go online and vote,” said junior Davis Walker.
On Thursday the campaigning was off the campus and on to the internet as social media got flooded with “go and vote” advertisements where teams were still trying to influence voters.
Although only 20% of the student body voted, this is one of the highest ranking years TSU has seen as far as voter turn out. It’s no secret that every vote counts, especially since one candidate won by only eight votes.
 The new Student Government Association leaders are Alicia Jones as Miss TSU, Jordan Gaither as Mister TSU, Aarian Forman as SGA President and Dexter Hooks as SGA vice president. With such dedicated students in the top four positions partnering with the other elected student leaders, it seems as if the 76th administration will be making a real difference at TSU.

A Junior Mass Communications student with a concentration in Marketing, Editor-in-Chief Shayla Simmons is a native Marylander. Shayla self identifies her editorial writing to be her strongsuit with topics ranging from politics to social issues to pop culture commentary.

The Presidential Race to the White House

The Presidential Race to the White House

By Khandi Wilson Meter Staff Writer For a while now, the news organizations and various websites have been covering comments made by candidates who are risking it all as well as their money, to become the President of the United States. The race has been […]