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Month: March 2016

The Kickoff to Sexual Assault Awareness Month

The Kickoff to Sexual Assault Awareness Month

By Xeñea Ford Meter Contributor The Sexual Assault Center in Nashville will host the Clothesline Project on the second floor of the Floyd Payne Student Center from April 1 to 8. The annual project kicks off Sexual Assault Awareness Month on the campus. This exhibition […]

Don’t Wait to Prepare for the Future

Don’t Wait to Prepare for the Future

By Ashley Parmer Editor-in-Chief of The Meter In the article “Businesses Boom for Undergraduates” recently published in the Tennessean, a writer takes a look at the businesses that have been developed from the ideas of the creative minds of local college students. Undergraduates from many […]

Nashville Scene Editor Talks with The Meter

Nashville Scene Editor Talks with The Meter

Andrea Zelinski, editor of the Nashville Scene talked with The Meter staff on her career in news on March 3.

Editorial

Editorial

By Ashley Parmer “Okay, ladies, now let’s get in formation.”  This line from Beyonce’s anthem is for all women, especially this month. March is Women’s History Month, and it’s time we recognize our power. Throughout history, Women have had to suffer many hardships to find […]

Women of Legend and Merit Awards Dinner March 22

Women of Legend and Merit Awards Dinner March 22

By Delvakio S. Brown This year marks the ninth annual Women of Legend and Merit Awards Dinner. On March 22, the Gentry Center will be transformed into an evening filled with Jazz music in the air, décor in resemblance of a royal feast, and filled with […]

Frances Williams, Distinguished Professor and Administrator, Joins TSU As Associate Dean in College of Engineering

Frances Williams, Distinguished Professor and Administrator, Joins TSU As Associate Dean in College of Engineering

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Dr. Frances Williams is the new associate dean for Graduate Studies and Research in the College of Engineering and Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Tennessee State University.

In her new role, Williams will manage the graduate programs, provide oversight and coordinate research grants and contracts, as well as identify and initiate new research opportunities and collaborative partnerships for the college.

Before coming to TSU Williams was a faculty member and director of the Center for Materials Research at Norfolk State University. She also was the director of Norfolk State’s Micro- and Nano-technology Center Cleanroom, a premiere research facility for fabricating micro- and nano-scale devices.

Her research focus is in the areas of advanced materials and devices, biosensors, and nano- and micro-electromechanical systems processing and devices. She has received grants totaling $14 million as a principal investigator or co-principal investigator. In 2010 she received a U.S. patent for developing a micromachined sensor for monitoring electrochemical deposition.

Williams has received various awards including the 2013 State Council of Higher Education for Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award, the highest faculty award given out by the state. In 2012, she was named an “Emerging Scholar” by Diverse Issues in Higher Education magazine. She also received Norfolk State’s top distinguished faculty award, the University Award of Excellence in 2010.

Williams is a member of several professional societies. She volunteers in various community programs that promote STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education for students from elementary to college age.

Williams holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University, and a Ph.D. in electrical and computer engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

President Glover Addresses 10-Point Plan

President Glover Addresses 10-Point Plan

By Shayla Simmons From last semester’s unsightly stint in the media to the state of the campus now, it is evident that a great change has taken place on the campus of Tennessee State University. The media has noticed this change once again, this time […]

TSU delves into governor’s FOCUS Act with students, faculty, administrators and alumni

TSU delves into governor’s FOCUS Act with students, faculty, administrators and alumni

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover and State Rep. Harold Love, Jr. held a forum at TSU to discuss a legislative proposal that would restructure higher education governance. Students, faculty, administrators, and alumni packed the Floyd-Payne Student Center auditorium on […]

Time for Black Americans to Get In Formation

Time for Black Americans to Get In Formation

By Ada Taylor

Mountains are moved when Black Americans come together and Beyoncé is one artist who understands this. This is the message behind her recent single “Formation” which dropped a day before she performed at Super Bowl 50 on Feb. 7.

But it isn’t just her song that was inspired by Black Power, but her halftime performance as well. Using the national platform of the Super Bowl, Beyoncé paid homage to the Black Panther Party with her costume choice. For some, this was upsetting. For others, it was empowering.

While some do not believe that entertainers have any place in politics, others loved to see their idol speaking out and uplifting their race. Women especially love the song.

At one point, Beyoncé reminded everyone how much money she has now compared to how much she had before. She says that she might be a black Bill Gates in the making, and that you can as well.  In fact, this is the entire idea behind formation.

To be in formation means that black people are working together instead of against one another, and this also extends to the larger community. This is why Beyoncé was sure to include the Black Panther Party in her concept of formation, because that is exactly how the Black Panthers came to fruition. The Panthers were born 50 years ago out of a need for black unity, protection and uplifting the black community. They provided breakfast to children who were hungry. now it is time to get in formation once again. It is clear that Beyoncé is taking a stand against police brutality in the video, even having officers raising their hands as if to say “don’t shoot”.

It is 2016 and race is still an issue for many people. What will you do to change this? Will you get in formation? Beyoncé would like to know. And what can we do here at Tennessee State University?

Luntz Educates Staff on Shooting Effective Video

Luntz Educates Staff on Shooting Effective Video

By Melody Scales With the world and technology steadily evolving, so does the way we tell stories. Jason Luntz, a social media strategist who helps organizations build a presence using social and multimedia and a professor  at TSU, gave “The Meter” a visit to teach […]