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Campus Unites, Moves Forward

Campus Unites, Moves Forward
Racia Poston and Brett Jackson, president and vice president of student  government association, listen to students concerns
Racia Poston and Brett Jackson, president and vice president of student
government association, listen to students concerns
Tennessee State students link arm in arm cutting off traffic by the front gate to pray and send a message letting the campus know that they are serious about change
Tennessee State students link arm in arm cutting off traffic by the front gate to pray and send a message letting the campus know that they are serious about change

By Leona Dunn
Meter Staff Writer

Tennessee State University Administration and Faculty did not waste time to address the concerns of students following the Oct. 22 shooting on the campus. On Friday, Oct. 23, a prayer service was held where Student Government Association President Racia Poston spoke, along with University President Glenda Glover, and Mount Zion Pastor Joseph Walker.

“Remind the students why they are here, they came here for an education. Hopefully this does not divide the campus but brings them closer together because this is a time where we all need each other’s love and prayers,” Rev. Walker said.

One male was killed and three females were injured, two shot and one grazed by a bullet during the late-night shooting which after a dice game went wrong near the student center. Former student Cameron Selmon was killed during the shooting.

“While walking back to Hale passing the old courtyard, all of a sudden I heard gunshots, next thing I know I’m running, there’s people tripping over each other and all I could hear was screams,” freshman Oneshia Evans said.

An emergency town hall meeting was called on Friday, Oct. 23 as well. The students discussed what they believed should be done as the campus moves forward. Shootings have happened too often at the university and emotions where high as students piled into the room with solutions and testimonies.

“Last night I asked a security guard didn’t three students just get shot and he said yeah, then I asked so why aren’t you checking ID’s?” He then responded oh most people that come here are students, and I’m asking but what if I’m not a student. I’m asking him why doesn’t  he care, it’s like they don’t care. I have never heard gunshots before I came to TSU,” sophomore, Kalynn Parks said, “ If you have this job you get paid to do this you signed up to do this nobody told you to do it, you wanted this job, so take this job serious cause I take my life serious and I didn’t come here to die.”

At the meeting students charged the student body, TSU administration, and Nashville government to all take a part in creating a safer community on campus. Talk of enforcing check points, fencing the campus, finding out how to create unity in the student body, having foot patrols, and even opening up a recreational setting for kids to have a productive place to go after 10pm at night were all discussed during the town hall.

“That could have been you out there in that courtyard, that could have been your friend, you all should be heated, you all should be mad cause now it’s not a Nashville problem it’s a TSU problem, this is up to us if you think someone’s going to come on campus and make everything okay that’s not going to happen until we step up,” Poston said.



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