Serving Tennessee State University and the Nashville Community Since 1950

Recent Posts

Injured TSU Linebacker Returns Home

Injured TSU Linebacker Returns Home

By Shayla Simmons Middle Linebacker, Christion Abercrombie, has returned to his hometown of Atlanta to begin rehab therapy for brain-injuries. On Oct. 17, he was transferred to the Shepherd Center from Vanderbilt Medical Center. It is expected that Abercrombie will enter the brain injury rehabilitation […]

Local Nonprofit Started by Junior at TSU

Local Nonprofit Started by Junior at TSU

By Deejay Darkins The Meter Staff Writer/Photo Editor Serving on Tennessee State University’s Student Government Association is about more than just wearing a crown. Junior, Sierra Holmes, used her platform as the 2017-2018 Miss Sophomore to unite the community in the spirit of spreading positivity […]

TSU Alumni Toss the dirt during Homecoming

TSU Alumni Toss the dirt during Homecoming

By Jailen Leavell

Tennessee State University has unveiled a major construction projects that will change the institution’s footprint forever. Thursday, October 18th was the groundbreaking for the Alumni Welcome Center.

The center will be the first privately funded building gifted to the University, as well as the first building to be funded by alumni.

Earlier this year, alums Amos and Brenda Otis made a commitment to build the center. “It is a privilege and a pleasure to be able to do something for the university that pulled me out of the streets of Detroit and gave me an education and an opportunity to be a productive citizen,” said Amos Otis.

Nathan Andrews was all smiles as he stood in front of what is now Humphries Hall and pointed to the parking lot on the other side – soon to be the home of the Alumni Welcome Center. Alumni gathered during the groundbreaking for photos, refreshments and remembrance of the plethora of memories they shared at Tennessee State University. Many expressed they look forward to the next celebration featuring the ribbon-cutting ceremony.

Alumni return to pass out special gifts

Alumni return to pass out special gifts

By Jailen Leavell Several alumni paused from this year’s Homecoming festivities to give back to the current students through the Big Blue Giveaway. “It’s an initiative that started six or seven years ago where alumni come back to campus and give back through cash, cards, […]

TSU Students voice their opinion on residence life

TSU Students voice their opinion on residence life

By Jailen Leavell Tennessee State University broke grown on two new Residence Halls Wednesday, Oct. 17. The new constructions cost an estimated $75.3 million. President Glenda Glover shared the news that this will be the first new residence hall in 23 years. In President Glovers […]

TSU Alumna Hosts ‘Chips n’ Chatter’ Book Club

TSU Alumna Hosts ‘Chips n’ Chatter’ Book Club

By Alexis Clark

Kimberly Vaughn, also known as, “Brownie,” is a motivational speaker dedicated to helping women to reach their aspirations. Vaughn is an author, podcast host, motivational speaker, voiceover artist, CEO of the ‘You Are Singled Out’ movement, and a TSU graduate.

‘You Are Singled Out’, is a movement that was launched in 2012 and is designed to help women to transition into a new, prosperous mindset by teaching women how to regain faith and overcome previous relationship dilemmas. Vaughn delivers powerful messages through her movement to woman across the country, helping individuals to progress from “chaos to confidence.”

“Brownie” has now brought her talents back to Tennessee State to give a voice to women on campus that may feel voiceless or fearful of expressing their emotions out in the open. Her target audience is primarily woman ranging in the ages of 18 to 30 years old. Vaughn’s goal is to help these women heal from their past relationships and move forward in their lives while making wiser decisions.

This year, Vaughn has collaborated with Reverend Michele Morton to launch an event on campus to empower students while tackling college. The ‘Chips n’ Chatter’ event has taken place every Tuesday at The Wesley Foundation and has been met with much success. Participating ladies mingle with one another and enjoy refreshments.

During Chips n’ Chatter, Vaughn and Rev. Morton also give each student Vaughn’s latest book, Confidence B4 Commitment, to invest in and coincide their relations with the novel. Topics range from finding your purpose in life, soul ties, mental health, closure and more. Each chapter is embedded with personal experiences and factual information.

Readers are given time to reflect and heal themselves with “Mirror Moments” and insightful questions with “Brownie Points” within each chapter.

“It’s all about forgiving themselves, forgiving others, getting rid of soul clutter and being rooted in their unduplicated identity,” stated Vaughn.

Vaughn elaborated about how she was motivated to step out on faith in God knowing that 43% of dating college women are experiencing violence and or abusive dating behaviors and she wants to do what she can to help black women heal and prosper.

Deyonna King, a student at TSU, has attended Chips n’ Chatter every Tuesday and spoke about how she finds the events to be comforting and how she enjoys the company saying, “Chips n’ Chatter is a super intimate setting and ladies can really open up and get their chance to feel relatable. It will reassure you that you’re not going through things alone. Brownie is an innovative woman who brings you raw, energetic information.”

Vaughn says she is planning on spreading her awareness and launching her events at other HBCUs to help others move from chaos to confidence.

TSU Awards First Getahn Ward Scholarship

TSU Awards First Getahn Ward Scholarship

Tennessee State University senior and Mass Communications major Alexis Clark is the first recipient of the Getahn Ward Memorial Scholarship that supports journalism students at the university. The award of $2000 was presented to Clark in the newsroom of The Tennessean, where Ward worked for […]

Worker Falls to Death at Wilson Hall

Worker Falls to Death at Wilson Hall

A self-employed electrician fell to his death on the campus of Tennessee State University on Oct. 29. The victim has been identified by Nashville Metro Police as 55-year-old Richard Bray, a Nashville resident. A subcontractor hired Bray for electrical construction for Wilson Hall, where he […]

A Plea to President Glover and the Administration of TSU

A Plea to President Glover and the Administration of TSU

By Shayla Simmons

Editor-in-Chief

In the four years I’ve had the pleasure of attending Tennessee State University, I’ve witnessed the triumphs and the pitfalls of our beloved HBCU. But in recent months, I’ve come to understand that this institution has fallen on a time of great struggle. Worse, this struggle is unknown to those that can make the most difference- the alumni of Tennessee State University and the Jefferson Street community.

President Glover and the entire administration of TSU are responsible for creating an “iron curtain” of whitewashed information for the public, creating a false sense of success. But the truth is that this administration is struggling to produce an environment conducive to higher learning.

In the months leading up to this semester, several students, myself included, were faced with issues regarding housing and financial aid. Upperclassmen have been housed in freshmen dorms because of unfit conditions in several on-campus apartment units. Those currently housed in apartment units have also reported mold and plumbing issues. I can not speak for students currently housed on-campus, but I must remind readers of the student protest held last year because of the living conditions in the Wilson dormitory.

Yet, as the homecoming festivities approached, students noticed new furniture in the campus library (when there were no complaints of the previous furniture) and decals pasted on broken elevators.

The situation for our learning conditions is just as bleak.

Across academic departments, there has been a noticeable lack of professors, creating larger class sizes as well as barring a number of students from taking mandatory classes due to unavailable staff. Both students and teachers alike have suffered under these conditions. Several faculty members have expressed issues with the administration, from low pay to unavailable resources.

The students of TSU hold a fierce loyalty to their HBCU, as they should. But this loyalty has created a fear of tarnishing the reputation of TSU. That has cost the student body their rights as students to livable conditions and an acceptable learning atmosphere.

I am not trying to insult the administration or insult the legacy of TSU. Rather, I implore those in charge to make better decisions with the student body in mind, not the judging eyes of the public.

The TSU motto is “Think. Work. Serve.” But our institution is making it difficult for us to live up to this standard.

I beg President Glover and the administration to live up to the excellent standards that have been set. Give us the resources we need to have stimulating classrooms. Provide us with more teachers that can aid our networks and assist us in reaching our career aspirations.

As a graduating senior, I have a responsibility to future students of Tennessee State. And I will use this platform to call for the implementation of the changes we need to see.

The ball is now in your court.

 

Kavanaugh’s Confirmation Sparks Protest and Pints

Kavanaugh’s Confirmation Sparks Protest and Pints

Protests against newly-sworn in Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh have been unrelenting and continuous, with protestors swarming Capitol Hill the day of the confirmation vote. Smaller protests were also held across the country. The outcry against Kavanaugh increased after several women stepped forward with allegations of […]